Ads

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4
  Print  
Author Topic: Q&D (Quick and Dirty) - 2nd Edition Revised  (Read 12284 times)
Administrator
Gelatinous Cube
*


View Profile
« Reply #15 on: November 13, 2012, 01:55:04 PM »

(Nothing here at the moment)
« Last Edit: November 26, 2013, 09:20:17 PM by sparkletwist » Logged


From out the wild wood comes the call...
Flumph
*


View Profile WWW
« Reply #16 on: December 03, 2012, 12:05:50 PM »

This is cool stuff.  I am surprised no one has commented yet.  I am currently working up some alternative class features that I intended to have show up in the CGQ&D Playtest, which I would happily share with you.

Also, at one point you gave a listing of what each skill rank "meant" as a point of reference, like "best in the room," "best on the block," "best in the nation," etc.  That might be useful to have posted.
Logged

Brother Guillotine of Loving Wisdom
My Campaigns:
Discuss Avayevnon here at the New Discussion Thread
Discuss Cad Goleor here: Cad Goleor

Bardistry Wands on Etsy

Review Badges:

Administrator
Gelatinous Cube
*


View Profile
« Reply #17 on: December 11, 2012, 01:56:50 PM »

Oops, sorry for not replying!
I would like to see them, of course.
Logged


From out the wild wood comes the call...
Flumph
*


View Profile WWW
« Reply #18 on: December 12, 2012, 01:06:56 AM »

In Character

Feats of Athleticism: Your Fenian training taught you to regularly perform feats that would seem impossible to others.  Spend an AP to describe an incredible feat of athletic prowess.  Roll athleticism at +10 for this action. 

Out of Character

This is based on the Fenian Cycle of Irish mythology, where Finn's band of warriors had to be able to leap over their height, duck under a log as low as their knee without slowing, run at full speed without snapping a twig, or without their hair becoming tussled, and any number of other feats of prowess to prove their worth.

In Character

Bard Song: Bards are well versed in magical songs. The Bard spends an AP and decides on a song, which is assigned a complexity by the GM: anything from 5 for a quick rhyme to 30+ for an elaborate ballad. The Bard then decides how many turns to break the Song into, rolling against a portion of the difficulty on each one. For example, a complexity 20 Song could be two turns of 10, or four turns of 5, or, if the Bard is very skilled or confident, could try to handle it all at once. The results are then adjudicated each turn of casting, except "Bonus Awesomeness" simply reduces remaining complexity by 2.  Song effects include debilitating laughter, sleep, grief, and fear.

Out of Character

This is essentially just a reflavored version of "Ritual," so not a whole lot to discuss.

In Character

Combat Prescience: In the midst of combat, you drift into a trance that expands your perceptions, allowing you to predict the movements of your enemies.  You gain +5 to any Melee or Athletics roll used to avoid an enemy attack.  

Out of Character

Celtic myth has a handful of warriors with mystical powers, including warrior-trainers with the ability to foresee future events.  This is meant to reflect the principle that such figures might have insight into what the battle had in store.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2013, 06:57:49 PM by Seraphine_Harmonium » Logged

Brother Guillotine of Loving Wisdom
My Campaigns:
Discuss Avayevnon here at the New Discussion Thread
Discuss Cad Goleor here: Cad Goleor

Bardistry Wands on Etsy

Review Badges:

Administrator
Gelatinous Cube
*


View Profile
« Reply #19 on: December 12, 2012, 02:16:22 PM »

Hmm. Interesting.

As a pedantic note, you seem to have swapped the purposes of your ic and ooc boxes. The ic box talks about mechanics and the ooc box has fluff in it. laugh

Anyway, the big problem with "Feats of Athleticism" is that it's more or less what everyone can do anyway. One of the big points of AP is to buy off complications and even turn a narrow failure into a success. So, spending an AP to do an athletic stunt and get a better outcome is essentially core Q&D, not a special ability.

I think the other two are better. I don't have much to say about "Bard Song," because I don't know how Ritual will work in practice yet, but it seemed balanced to me when I wrote it, so Bard Song does as well. "Combat Prescience" also seems pretty good, although +5 to avoid all attacks might be a little too good if it is something of a combat-focused game. I tried to make it so that the "+5 to a thing" abilities would generally be invoked rarely enough that it seems special-- like, an opportunity for a certain character to shine. If combat is rarer, it might well be that case, too, though.

Those two would definitely be good things to throw into the "grab bag," if nothing else. laugh
Logged


Administrator
Gelatinous Cube
*


View Profile
« Reply #20 on: December 15, 2012, 02:42:43 PM »

With the talk of switching Cad Goleor over to Q&D, Seraphine_Harmonium and I played a short Q&D one-shot game, set in Cad Goleor.

Well, sort of. I was GMing it, and I'm far from intimately familiar with the setting, so it was more "generic Celtic setting that we're pretending is Cad Goleor." I guess I didn't abuse it too badly, though. Anyway, SH's character was named Brodan, a wandering warrior who had been disgraced. We began with him having been wandering for quite some time, and, with the day nearing its end, he was seeking shelter and especially something to eat. He was seen by a farmer (named Bigh Mac Anfrais... please don't throw things at me) who would've been happy to let Brodan wander on his way, but, oh, culturally speaking, it's just not right to not show a weary traveler some hospitality.

Brodan ate his fill (and then some, thanks to a compel on his boorish nature) and the farmer and his wife were getting quite tired of him, especially when he started frightening their young son, who always referred to Brodan as "the smelly man." In truth, Brodan was just one of their many problems lately, for it seems the fae had chosen their small village to torment.

The good meal was heavy in Brodan's stomach, and (thanks to a horribly botched Perception roll) he slept quite soundly. Soundly enough he didn't even notice the fae coming that night, and I'm sure the townspeople had something to do with pointing out their boorish guest. Better to take him away than some of the town's children, after all.

When he awoke, he was the guest of a sidhe woman with wild hair and even more wild eyes. She had the kind of figure that would've been appealing on a modern supermodel, but, for the time, probably looked on the skinny side. She looked like she could use a good meal-- unfortunately, she agreed, and from where she was aiming the long blades that she had instead of fingernails, Brodan was it. She was joined by a nasty little Redcap who didn't talk much, just mumbling "aghahaga" and similar noises.

A fight broke out! The evildoers had the early advantage, landing a couple of good hits that took away 7 of Brodan's 10 stress, but he landed a fierce hit on the Redcap, which, through the use of an AP and his warrior class ability, took it out of the fight in one hit. Another AP gave him an extra turn against the Sidhe, using a combat maneuver to knock her off balance, and then following up on his next turn with a mighty thrust with his spear, taking the Sidhe out.

It wasn't cold iron, so these two will probably survive, but they're no threat for now. And as for Brodan, he is lost in the middle of... well, where is he? A good place to stop, and a jumping off point for future adventures, should we decide to have them.

We got to test out both social mechanics and combat, and got to use some of Q&D's features, so I think it worked out pretty well.  grin
Logged


From out the wild wood comes the call...
Flumph
*


View Profile WWW
« Reply #21 on: December 19, 2012, 10:20:32 PM »

I have a question about Stress: there is a mention of characters getting a full allocation of stress the next time they are "in action."  Now, this DOES follow a mention of the character being taken out, and you later mention recovering stress by resting or magic.  So my question is: Do characters always recover all stress from one encounter to the next, or just characters that get taken out?  If the latter, how quickly would could one expect to recover stress?  1 Stress/hour?  1/day?  Is there a skill roll involved that determines how quickly you recover?
Logged

Brother Guillotine of Loving Wisdom
My Campaigns:
Discuss Avayevnon here at the New Discussion Thread
Discuss Cad Goleor here: Cad Goleor

Bardistry Wands on Etsy

Review Badges:

Administrator
Gelatinous Cube
*


View Profile
« Reply #22 on: December 22, 2012, 05:15:39 PM »

This is actually something I wrote up quickly, and probably need more consideration and playtests to actually come up with a worthwhile answer. I'm actually not quite sure what I meant!

So, let's think this through. The idea behind Q&D's stress is that you never have very much, but it recovers quickly. This makes combat quick and dangerous, but you're usually not dragging around lingering injuries, or having to wait long periods to heal up. I think that any time characters have a significant amount of downtime, like more than one in-game day of not adventuring or doing heavy labor or anything, they should get their full allocation of Stress back. Characters that have been taken out will usually need to rest up for a while, so they'll be back at full strength, too, reflecting the earlier rule but making more sense about it.

As for the exact timing otherwise, it should be up to the GM, determined by the theme of the game. In a cinematic game where the encounters are fast and furious, characters should get a full allocation every encounter. In a grittier game, where long-term attrition is more of a factor, then they should have to rest in order to get it back, and being worn down becomes more of a problem.
Logged


From out the wild wood comes the call...
Flumph
*


View Profile WWW
« Reply #23 on: December 23, 2012, 11:50:58 AM »

sparkletwist

This is actually something I wrote up quickly, and probably need more consideration and playtests to actually come up with a worthwhile answer. I'm actually not quite sure what I meant!

So, let's think this through. The idea behind Q&D's stress is that you never have very much, but it recovers quickly. This makes combat quick and dangerous, but you're usually not dragging around lingering injuries, or having to wait long periods to heal up. I think that any time characters have a significant amount of downtime, like more than one in-game day of not adventuring or doing heavy labor or anything, they should get their full allocation of Stress back. Characters that have been taken out will usually need to rest up for a while, so they'll be back at full strength, too, reflecting the earlier rule but making more sense about it.

As for the exact timing otherwise, it should be up to the GM, determined by the theme of the game. In a cinematic game where the encounters are fast and furious, characters should get a full allocation every encounter. In a grittier game, where long-term attrition is more of a factor, then they should have to rest in order to get it back, and being worn down becomes more of a problem.
Though it would need a bit more book-keeping, I think Vreeg had an idea where half of the damage taken would be lifted as soon as the encounter was over, while the other half would linger.  Maybe something along these lines would show that there are some consequences to getting hurt or worn down from one battle to the next, while showing that a lot of the stresses of combat will go away when the battle is done.

Alternatively, perhaps rest and magical healing only apply to negative consequences of getting taken out?  Or the "other bad stuff" from an Epic Fail?  My understanding is that getting "taken out" refers to any injury that removes you from that combat.  In theory you need not even lose consciousness, as long as you are unable to participate.  So something like a bad stab wound, a broken bone, a concussion, and so forth could all take someone out of combat.  And while you could stop a puncture wound from bleeding, or set a broken bone, the effects of these would in actuality not go away once the battle was done.
Logged

Brother Guillotine of Loving Wisdom
My Campaigns:
Discuss Avayevnon here at the New Discussion Thread
Discuss Cad Goleor here: Cad Goleor

Bardistry Wands on Etsy

Review Badges:

Administrator
Gelatinous Cube
*


View Profile
« Reply #24 on: December 23, 2012, 03:00:43 PM »

If that's the kind of idea that you want, a FATE-like system of consequences would probably be the best thing. This is what Asura uses, as well: you have HP that recover very fast, then you have Consequences that you suffer when you are (nearly) out of HP, and those recover more slowly. It also makes the bookkeeping a little more transparent, rather than having to worry about "how much Stress do I get back" and so on.

I thought that even this would be too complicated for Q&D, to be honest! I was deliberately trying to stay close to the simple albeit unrealistic D&D approach to damage. However, Q&D is pretty hackable, so I encourage development in this direction!
Logged


Administrator
Gelatinous Cube
*


View Profile
« Reply #25 on: January 04, 2013, 12:45:45 PM »

I've added the "Profession" system discussed in the Cad Goleor thread.
Logged


Administrator
Gelatinous Cube
*


View Profile
« Reply #26 on: November 26, 2013, 09:17:40 PM »

Archiving the old version here.
Logged


Administrator
Gelatinous Cube
*


View Profile
« Reply #27 on: November 26, 2013, 09:18:05 PM »

More archives.
Logged


Administrator
Gelatinous Cube
*


View Profile
« Reply #28 on: November 26, 2013, 09:18:27 PM »

Reserved for future archives or whatever.
Logged


Administrator
Gelatinous Cube
*


View Profile
« Reply #29 on: November 26, 2013, 09:18:36 PM »

This post intentionally left blank.
Logged


Pages: 1 [2] 3 4
  Print  
 
Jump to: