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Author Topic: Generic Adventuring Template  (Read 362 times)
Giant Space Hamster
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« on: March 01, 2012, 05:16:38 PM »

It strikes me that all adventurers have certain things in common - they all have a way to kill things and a set other skills that lets them accomplish specialized tasks.  The manner in which they fight may differ from one to another, as do their various specialties (some actually specialize in fighting, others at other adventuring tasks).  So what I'd like to do is hash out a template, in generic form, for an adventurer.

I think the initial structure should include an overall minimal Adventurer package that includes basic skills, traits, and attributes; a combat style of some sort that would include a dash of further specialization; and optional specialties that would cover tasks like social engineering, investigation, intrusion, healing, etc.

I'm intersted in a few things:
  • What's your take on this idea?
  • What generalized non-combat tasks do adventurers regularly partake in?
  • What sort of martial arts do you think players would be interested in?
« Last Edit: March 01, 2012, 08:20:52 PM by Humabout » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2012, 08:38:10 PM »

In not sure where to begin. What is the purpose of said template? Is a template for describing a character, or a template for presenting statistics? Is it story oriented, or game oriented?

As for your other questions, adventurers regularly participate in 4 things, in my opinion: exploration (involving physical and sensory skills), investigation (involving sensory and knowledge skills), problem solving (traditional thief things, like dealing with traps, or stealing a key), and social interaction (involving knowledge, sensory, and social skills). It's annoying that so much seems to be handled solely by the thief, but looking at it this way helps make designers aware that everyone should be good at something (fighters having superior physical stats can be useful at exploration, and one could even stretch and say many should have something to do in socials, be it the diplomacy of a noble knight or the intimidation of a grizzled veteran).

Martial arts, though seem like they'd depend far more on the setting in question. I find it to be a tragedy, though, that popular media has exemplified the fighting styles of the east (everyone knows the names of Karate and Kung-Fu, if not others), while forgetting the different styles that must have been present in the east. Eastern techniques are considered art forms, even their swordsmanship, while the west is ignored. I'm a poor historian, though, so I can't make any comments on what styles existed in the west, only to say that I'd make sure my western inspired setting had styles (and in fact, I have 5 styles practiced by the knighthood).
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« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2012, 06:02:45 PM »

I want to eventually work up an adventurer template for gurps and I think I have a way that'll keep it nice and generic.  I'm just gathering ideas before really mashing it out.

That is a nice breakdown:  Exploration, Investigation, Problem Solving, Social Interaction.  I might generalize Exploration to Getting Places, since Exploration would entail all of the necessary survival skills to move around outside of civilization.  I could then include things like a rogue's crazy parkour tricks and other intrusion methods as part of "Getting Places."  Investigation and Social Interaction would technically both be Social Engineering, although I'm not sure where to stick things like forgery and thieving.  Anyway, based on this, I see the following:


I have a preliminary list of RL western martial arts that range from Armatura Equistris (preacticed through early medieval times) to a variety of sword styles (from fencing styles to standard sword-and-board to Longsword Fighting of the famed dopplegangers), and such.  I'm just don't want to miss anything that's typically suitable to a fantasy setting that isn't readily apparent (or that I might otherwise randomly miss).  I'd also wonder if I should bother to include any Eastern martial arts or not.  They (and the Monk) always seemed out of place in DnD to me.
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« Reply #3 on: April 02, 2012, 02:32:01 PM »

Here's some stuff I've come up with so far.  The first wall-o-text are descriptions of various competancies a fantasy hero might wish to employ at some point.  They represt a fairly high degree of focus and can form interesting combinations that would tailor a PC to his niche within a team fo adventurers.  I see a typical PC choosing up to three of these, although it's possible to take four or five, if the player forgoes more detailed customization.  The second list is merely a listing of various martial arts present in a typical European fantasy setting (as far as I can come think of); it does not include any asian, arabic, persian, african, or american martial arts.  A typical PC should take at least one of these and possibly more than one.

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« Reply #4 on: April 02, 2012, 03:43:05 PM »

Love the Competencies. If I ever run a Barbarians of Lemuria game I might use them instead of Careers.
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« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2012, 05:22:35 PM »

The idea is to have a basic template with one Martial Art slot and three slots for competencies or additional martial arts.  Extra points from disadvantages lets you buy individual skills, advantages, or additional competencies.  I am running into difficulties with casters, since I intend to go with Magic as Powers for anything quick (Spellcraft is akin to Path/Book magic from Thaumaturgy and intended for out-of-combat use).  I'm considering just giving out the blocks of points for use in magic powers.  Other powers (chi/rage/etc) can be bought with earned points or extra point from disadvantages.  Or so that's the plan.  I'll post a basic template eventually here.
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« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2012, 12:33:23 PM »

It seems that fantasy adventurers have so much in common across settings that this work has inspired the filling of holes for LARP mechanics outside of GURPs. smile
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« Reply #7 on: April 03, 2012, 04:04:24 PM »

Want to know the really funny thing?  Kromm's game material I raided was actually intended for a modern spy/jason bourne-like campaign, from the looks of his notes.  It's really funny just how generic all of this stuff is; I only needed to alter a a few things and change a couple fo foci (and 90% of that was mechanical and not in the descriptiosn themselves).
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