Ads

Pages: 1 ... 120 121 [122] 123 124 125
  Print  
Author Topic: The Republic Reborn  (Read 189968 times)
The Holiest of Carp
Flail Snail
*


View Profile WWW
« Reply #1815 on: July 15, 2014, 02:17:30 AM »

Nomadic

Sismondii and his men will seek out Pierleoni to figure out exactly what is going on and to offer what assistance they can.

This short vignette, posted last page, describes basically what is happening in the Leonine, from the perspective of the Patrician and those (including the stay-behind senators) who are with him in the Castle St. Angelo:


In other words, the story so far:
  • There was a commotion at the Basilica, with varying claims of who was Pope
  • Initially, the basilica was stormed by partisans (some armed, some not) acclaiming Octavian as Pope Victor
  • Victor left the Basilica for the Vatican Palace, just north of the Basilica; Rolando, acclaimed as Pope Alexander by others, appears to have fled the Basilica by another route
  • Immediately thereafter, the Prefect's forces arrived at the Basilica, said Alexander was the true Pope, and attempted to arrest "Victor," but he was already gone
  • A fight broke out on the Basilica steps between the Prefect's men and the pro-Victor partisans that remained, which the Prefect's knights won rather easily
  • The remaining pro-Victor partisans fell back to the Palace, where they were joined by some Imperial knights
  • The Prefectural forces attacked the Palace, but were forced back when Pierleonist forces joined the fight on the pro-Victor side
  • Meanwhile, Pope Alexander is believed to be in the munitio, the defensive tower just southwest of the Basilica.

What is happening right now:
  • Prefectural (pro-Alexander) forces are continuing to make forays against the Palace; they clearly outnumber the defenders
  • Prefectural forces have also attacked parts of the wall from the inside; the northern gatehouse of the Leonine is still in Pierleonist hands, but the status of the wall west of that is uncertain
  • If the Prefectural forces take the gatehouse, it may result in Frangipani's several hundred horsemen, camped just north of the Leonine, being able to enter - though it is unclear if Signore Frangipani yet knows about what's going on in the Leonine

And now the most current news...

In the Senate

The Senate is mostly in support of mustering the militia to secure the Leonine City; as many senators have said, even if the Patrician is in charge of the enclave, it is still Roman, and Roman troops have a right to be there.

The Senate is more split on the matter of negotiations.  The Arnoldists bitterly oppose negotiations with the Prefect and Frangipani; to them, these figures have no legitimate role in Rome, and the Prefect ought to be expelled for stirring up violence in the city.  The equestrians and non-Arnoldists common senators disagree - the last thing Rome needs, they say, is to start a war with the Church (by attacking the Prefect) and the Frangipani simultaneously.  While this party mostly supports sending military relief, they believe the Senate ought not to take a side just yet; a show of force will compel the parties to back down.  The Arnoldists counter that the Church and the Frangipani are likely to go to war with Rome anyway if their "false Pope" Rolando escapes and establishes control of the rest of Latium; in the schism of 1130, they note, the exact same thing happened, with the legitimate Pierleoni Pope Anacletus II essentially confined to Rome while the pro-Frangipani Pope Innocent II gathered the support of the kings of Europe.

In the Leonine City

The Patrician appears to be getting ready to lead some sort of foray - personally.  He has donned his hauberk and girded on his sword, and his forces are gathering in the castle armory.  He seems set on attacking the munitio directly, where Pope Alexander is believed to be; if Alexander is captured - or killed - the Prefect, he says, cannot continue to fight.  The munitio, however, is on the opposite side of the Leonine from the castle, and between the two is the Basilica along with the Prefect's whole force.  His nephew Cencio asked if it would not be better to defend the gatehouse, the only thing that prevents Frangipani's knights from flooding in, but his uncle rebuffed him.  Others have wondered aloud whether it would not be better to try and recover Pope Victor from the Palace, where he is virtually besieged along with the Imperial knights, but the Patrician seems fixated on striking a "felling blow" at his enemies.

There is no word from Rome proper.  For now, Pierleonist forces control the bridges, and any relief force should be able to pass, but by gathering his forces in the castle the Patrician has stripped most of his soldiers from the walls (save those currently engaged around the gatehouse), and it is unclear if the bridge garrisons would be able to hold if the Prefect shifted his attack towards them.

No movement has been seen in the Frangipani camp to the north.  The extent of their knowledge of the situation remains uncertain, as does their intent.

Regarding the Leonine City, all of these discussions and preparations are going on right now, and characters there can speak to the Patrician or anyone else present just like the characters in Rome are speaking before the Senate.
« Last Edit: July 15, 2014, 02:20:18 AM by Polycarp » Logged

The Clockwork Jungle (wiki | thread)
"The impediment to action advances action. What stands in the way becomes the way." - Marcus Aurelius

I always take 20
Administrator
Flumph
*


View Profile
« Reply #1816 on: July 15, 2014, 02:18:47 PM »

To Giordano Pierleoni

Please my friend, I acknowledge your just anger at those so clearly prepared to usurp the papacy from its rightful heir but I feel I must caution against any action taken under such anger. Rash decisions now may cost those under our charge dearly. I feel your nephew speaks wisdom. Let us defend and maintain a strong position here while we can. The Leonine City was given into your charge, but do not forget that Roma herself is the charge of the senate and by extension the stability of your charge is their business. Knowing the Consuls as I do I cannot doubt that they shall come to our aid once they have organized Rome's forces. They cannot suffer that usurpers attack you on your own land when you have sworn loyalty to them and that land lies within the territory they are obligated to defend. The forces arrayed against us currently outnumber our own, but they pale against the forces Rome may bring to bear. If then we may hold fast until they arrive we may fully crush these usurpers and restore stability to the city. Further if you know of ways that we may make it easier for any senatorial assistance to aid us it might be good to see it is done. Regardless I beg that you stop and give yourself time to cool, this must be a time for rational thought not passionate revenge. Do not risk the lives of yourself and your men in hopes of sating your anger (just though it be).
Logged

Accretion of sensory data f/k/a ElDo
Gelatinous Cube
*


View Profile
« Reply #1817 on: July 15, 2014, 08:27:01 PM »

Plea to Giordano Pierleoni

Good patrician, if you are going to set out to spill blood today, you must spill mine first. I will ever resist any effort to plunge my beloved city into anarchy, to let the gutters run red due to your indiscretions. I stand before you as a representative of the Senate, as a Roman in need, and as a friend to your family.

We are men of Christ, as are your adversaries. To seek a foray into this chaos, to strike out against our brothers in faith during the violence, will not ennoble your cause, nor polish your family name. Will history know you as Giordano Popekiller? Giordano the Cruel? Or will you preserve your hard-earned dignity and earn Rome its peace through reserve?

I implore you, if at all possible, to find the goodness within you to act as protector, not agitator. Hold the gatehouse, as your nephew has asked, and let the lawful forces of our blessed city and our hard-won allies join you in the melee.

If you are intent on taking lives, on lighting the city on fire, on letting Rome turn ugliest as the world looks upon it, and on encouraging this division between the clergy by seeking the death of one of their number, then take my life first, because I will not suffer to become some German King's lapdog, nor to see the righteous name Pierleone become that of some common butcher.
Logged

Oh, how we danced and we swallowed the night
For it was all ripe for dreaming
Oh, how we danced away all of the lights
We've always been out of our minds
-Tom Waits, Rain Dogs

Gelatinous Cube
*


View Profile
« Reply #1818 on: July 15, 2014, 09:35:47 PM »

>>Will history know you as Giordano Popekiller?

Well, he already killed one. tongue.

Maybe he could have a splatter-movie made for him: Giordano Popeslayer.
Logged


Accretion of sensory data f/k/a ElDo
Gelatinous Cube
*


View Profile
« Reply #1819 on: July 15, 2014, 09:38:21 PM »

Light Dragon

>>Will history know you as Giordano Popekiller?

Well, he already killed one. tongue.

To kill one pope is a peculiar thing; to kill two is certainly a conscious habit, an extravagant affectation worthy of history's regard.
Logged

Oh, how we danced and we swallowed the night
For it was all ripe for dreaming
Oh, how we danced away all of the lights
We've always been out of our minds
-Tom Waits, Rain Dogs

I always take 20
Administrator
Flumph
*


View Profile
« Reply #1820 on: July 15, 2014, 11:23:10 PM »

Maybe there's a kill one pope get one free special we haven't heard about...
Logged

The Holiest of Carp
Flail Snail
*


View Profile WWW
« Reply #1821 on: July 20, 2014, 10:20:09 PM »

Giodarno Pierleoni to the Senators

You counsel me to wait for the militia - but what will they do when they arrive?

In your city you are powerful, but outside these walls, Rome is nothing.  My brother, when he was the rightful pope, held this city - and nothing else.  The world bent its ear to a Frangipani impostor.  This city was under the censure of all of Christendom for eight years, and when my brother died it was only the "charity" of the usurper that I and all my faithful allies were not put to death, just for standing for the rightful father.

So when the militia comes to my rescue, what then?  If Antonio and his priest should flee, you will have all Latium against you.  The emperor's favor will be little comfort then!  Or perhaps Antonio will bar himself in the munitio - that will hold for some time, with his knights.  Will the militia guard the city against the full weight of Frangipani might while still keeping a noose taught around the munitio?  Are you prepared for war?  And if, by the grace of God, they surrender to you, what then?  Do you intend to keep a Sienese Cardinal under lock and key?  What a pretext you will throw to Oddone Frangipani then - he will lay siege to this city in the name of the Holy Father, wasting piously away in the dungeons of the rebels and heretics.  Whatever happens, you shall have war.

As I see it you have only one chance to stop it - Alexander's death.  Send Oddone and Antonio away empty-handed, and their vassals will not have the stomach for war.  There will be but one Pope, and he will be your ally.

You can call me cruel if you want, Barzalomeus, but nothing I do today can be as cruel as the war that is surely coming.  Beat your breast and call me Giordano Bloody-handed, call me accursed; I have borne worse, from more powerful men.  I will not mind if you look the other way while I do what must be done, and you all can remain the unsoiled conscience of the republic, wringing your hands in the Senate.

I swore my loyalty, and if you will not have me fight this battle, I will not.  But I warn you - a Pope's death ended the last schism, and only a Pope's death will end this one.  If this does not end today, it may be a long time coming, and those will be cruel years for us all.

This is only to the senators present in the Leonine, obviously.

Due Date

Orders for this event are due Friday, July 25 (for real this time!).
Logged

The Clockwork Jungle (wiki | thread)
"The impediment to action advances action. What stands in the way becomes the way." - Marcus Aurelius

The Holiest of Carp
Flail Snail
*


View Profile WWW
« Reply #1822 on: July 24, 2014, 11:50:15 PM »

Quick reminder that tomorrow is the last day to post orders.
Logged

The Clockwork Jungle (wiki | thread)
"The impediment to action advances action. What stands in the way becomes the way." - Marcus Aurelius

I always take 20
Administrator
Flumph
*


View Profile
« Reply #1823 on: July 25, 2014, 02:21:59 PM »

In Response to Pierleoni

If I am not quite mistaken the last schism only ended in such injustice because the pretender gained the ears of Europe and her kings. I do not believe that will be the case this time for it seems that the Germans support the rightful Pope, Victor. At worst this new pretender may rally some of Latium to his cause, and that is a foe we are better prepared to match. Nevertheless, I fear you are correct. We do not now need war and would be better to avoid it.

*Sismondii draws his sword*

So be it, let it not be said that I a senator threw my friend and ally to the dogs he was so eager to destroy. You have me and my men and what little support we may offer. I still council we wait for the senate, yet if you will not then you shall at least have me and mine at your right hand.

Orders

If Pierleoni is adamant on the attack Sismondii will join him and his men. As they are few in number and Sismondii has only little experience of combat he shall leave the main push of the attack to Pierleoni and instead do what he can to support his flank. If Sismondii gets a chance to capture the false Pope he will do so in favor of slaying him.
Logged

Accretion of sensory data f/k/a ElDo
Gelatinous Cube
*


View Profile
« Reply #1824 on: July 25, 2014, 11:26:17 PM »

Orders

Keep as far from trouble as possible.
Logged

Oh, how we danced and we swallowed the night
For it was all ripe for dreaming
Oh, how we danced away all of the lights
We've always been out of our minds
-Tom Waits, Rain Dogs

Modron
*


View Profile
« Reply #1825 on: August 24, 2014, 07:23:33 PM »

I miss this game.
Logged


The Holiest of Carp
Flail Snail
*


View Profile WWW
« Reply #1826 on: August 25, 2014, 11:41:29 PM »

I moved.  Shit happened.  Update will be up by Wednesday.
Logged

The Clockwork Jungle (wiki | thread)
"The impediment to action advances action. What stands in the way becomes the way." - Marcus Aurelius

Modron
*


View Profile
« Reply #1827 on: August 26, 2014, 03:50:40 PM »

Haha, that's quick!

Hope all went and is going well for you! And the other players.
Logged


The Holiest of Carp
Flail Snail
*


View Profile WWW
« Reply #1828 on: August 28, 2014, 03:27:47 AM »

Well, this is embarrassing, but I burned my finger in a freak tea accident and can only type with one hand right now.  Hopefully update sometime Thursday.
Logged

The Clockwork Jungle (wiki | thread)
"The impediment to action advances action. What stands in the way becomes the way." - Marcus Aurelius

The Holiest of Carp
Flail Snail
*


View Profile WWW
« Reply #1829 on: August 29, 2014, 05:21:43 AM »


The Battle of the Vatican

On the afternoon of September 8th, 1159, Patrician Pierleoni led his personal forces, along with a handful of Senatorial masnada, out from the Castle St. Angelo in an attempt to attack the munitio, the small fortified tower adjacent to the Basilica of Saint Peter.  The alleged “Frangipanist” Pope, Alexander (previously Rolando Bandinelli), was said to be there, and the Patrician hoped to end the chaos and the schism together by taking him prisoner – or killing him.

Meanwhile, in Rome proper, Consul Basile and Leonardo Manzinni (son of Senator Vittorio) were moving on the Leonine City from the Campus Martius.  Manzinni had been able to move first with a small group of Palatini.  Consul Basile had called for a militia muster, but it became apparent that this was not going to be completed – or even close to it – in a reasonable period of time.  Gathering a group of militiamen and volunteers from the surrounding district, the Consul followed Manzinni shortly thereafter with his own masnada and these militia elements, leaving other senators to continue the muster.

The first arrivals to the eastern gates of the Leonine, however, were Romans under what passed for Imperial command – the Reichsmarschall at the head of a mob, joined by a few Imperial knights and strengthened by Arnoldists and other firebrands.  This group pressed immediately over the bridge, which was held by a mere handful of Pierleonist guardsmen; with no mind to oppose them and no orders to do so, the mob began pouring into the Leonine from the east.

The Prefectural forces, massing for an attack on the northern gatehouse, spotted the Pierleonist advance westward through the city and assumed this was an effort to flank them.  A number of the Prefect’s knights re-mounted their horses and moved to counterattack, while the remainder stormed the gatehouse; with no reinforcements, its defenders put up only token resistance before abandoning their posts and withdrawing along the wall towards the Castle St. Angelo.  While the Pierleonists had not escaped detection, the detachment sent to deal with them was meant only as a delaying rearguard for the gate assault and could not arrest their progress westward.

At this point, a fire was lit atop one of the gatehouse towers, sending a plume of smoke into the sky.  This was soon observed by Senator de Vinti, who was leading yet another force towards the Leonine via Trastevere and the Janiculum.  De Vinti sent the handful of his men with horses up ahead to observe the Frangipani camp, and they rode back to report that the Frangipanist knights appeared to be moving in force on the Leonine.  Unable to reach them in time to intercept, de Vinti’s forces attempted to scale the western end of the Leonine Wall.  Ordinarily, attempting this with a handful of hastily assembled ladders would be suicidal; fortunately for de Vinti and his men, this part of the wall had been completely abandoned, and they began their escalade unopposed.

Now realizing the true aim of the Pierleonists, the Prefect led his men westward.  The Pierleonists had overran the Basilica and were now encircling the munitio.  Cardinal Bernardo, Archpriest of the Basilica, called out for a truce from the munitio, but his pleas were ignored.  Yet the Pierleonists could not immediately force their way into the tower, which had been barricaded from within; they set a fire at the base of the gate, but it had not yet breached the defenses when they were set upon by the Prefect’s knights.

The Basilica of Saint Peter, one of the holiest places in Rome, was now the site of a desperate battle.  Pierleoni’s men were outmatched by the Latin knights, but used the basilica itself as a fortification to try and even their advantage against mounted troops.  Their ingenuity, however, only counted for so much.  On the steps of the Shrine of Saint Petronilla, the Patrician was struck with a lance by one of the Prefect’s knights.  Bereft of their leadership, the Pierleonist armsmen began to rout.

Senator Sismondii, who had joined the Patrician, managed to escape the Basilica with a number of his own men and some of the Patrician’s armsmen.  This group retreated northwards towards the Vatican Palace, where the other pontiff – Pope Victor, formerly Ottaviano Crescenzi – had himself been trapped.  Sismondii, however, found the palace abandoned, and he and his men were soon surrounded in the badly damaged palace by the Prefect’s men.  Antonio demanded that “Octavian” surrender, believing him to still be inside; Sismondii delayed for as long as possible, until the knights began to set fire to the building, at which point there was no other alternative other than to give in.

Enraged to find no Octavian within, the Prefect ordered the senator and his men to be taken prisoner, and then began to search the area.  Octavian and the imperial knights with him were soon found, approaching the western wall.  There was no gatehouse there – surely they would be trapped like rats.  If Antonio saw de Vinti’s men atop the wall, he may well have assumed them to be his own men; after all, the gatehouse had fallen and the Pierleonists had retreated east, abandoning the walls elsewhere.  He may have thought this right up to the moment when, having cornered Octavian and his men against the wall, one of de Vinti’s crossbowmen shot him in the throat.  His knights, panicked by the unexpected barrage and the mortal wounding of their leader, fled, and the Roman Pope and his entourage were spirited to safety by de Vinti’s soldiers.

The battle in the east of the Leonine City soon ended – casualties among the mob had mounted, and the arrival of Antonio’s knights from the west (albeit without Antonio) set many into a panic.  The capture of the Leonine City, however, could not be completed, for the Roman Militia and the Pierleonist remnants were in firm control of the Castle St. Angelo.  Without the castle, no occupier could control the bridges or assure the safety of the walls or northern gate.  Roman reinforcements would certainly come as the militia muster continued, a fact which Oddone Frangipani surely realized.

As the sun set and dusk fell upon Rome, the Latin knights exited the city by the northern gatehouse in good order.  Frangipani’s men made their first stop at the rocca of Senator Sismondii, where Oddone ordered the senator and his men to be released from captivity.  From there, they turned east, crossing the Milvian bridge and moving on beyond the sight of Sismondii's tower.

Aftermath

The Romans had now regained control of the Leonine City, but at a significant cost.  Patrician Pierleoni was dead, along with most of his men.  The fire set to burn down the doors of the munitio had raged out of control, gutting the whole tower; initially, it was assumed that Alexander and most of the cardinals must have died in that conflagration, but a secret passage between the munitio and the basilica was subsequently discovered, no doubt used by the cardinals to escape to the munitio in the first place.  In later days, it would be confirmed that Alexander and the cardinals loyal to him had escaped with Oddone and his knights.

The munitio was not the only part of the city to suffer.  The Basilica itself was in a shambles, with dead men and horses strewn in the nave, its doors staved in, its stained glass windows smashed, and numerous carpets, tapestries, and even religious objects soiled, destroyed, or missing.  The Vatican Palace, already suffering from years of neglect, has also been badly damaged.  Many of the homes and shops of the Leonine City’s own residents, mostly in the eastern region, were looted or burned, with most of the damage probably from the Roman mob itself.

In rebelliousness, the Romans had now surpassed themselves; while they had driven numerous prefects out of the city in generations past, as far as anyone knew Antonio was the first prefect to actually be killed.  His death was not known until the day after the battle, when his body was found and the likely cause deduced – de Vinti’s men had simply seen Latin knights running down a group of Imperials and clergy and shot at them, apparently unaware that they had killed the praefectus urbi.

The late Patrician’s plan to quickly end the schism has failed, and his failure was paid for by his life.  For the time being, “Pope Victor” resides in Trastevere, and “Pope Alexander” is believed to be heading east on the Via Tiburtina, which heads towards Tivoli and the Frangipani lands nearby.  It is possible that his foray against the munitio was ill-considered; on the other hand, the northern gatehouse may have fallen anyway, and Pierleoni’s attack may have given Alexander his only opportunity to escape a tightening noose around the palace.

It is now the 10th of September, and the political situation of Latium is completely uncertain.  Pope Victor has claimed to be the sole and legitimate Pope, as expected; nothing has yet been heard of Pope Alexander, but it is notable that the majority of the cardinals seem to have escaped with him rather than remaining with Victor.  Most of the Roman nobility present in Rome have declined to pledge to either pontiff, no doubt attempting to ascertain who the "winning" side will be.  Signore Colonna and all his noble guests have left the city in haste to repair to their own holdings.

The path ahead is uncertain...

Updates Resume

This is the final event.  The Autumn turn now resumes; please post orders for the rest of the season.  Because it's been a while since the last regular update, you may wish to reread it, located here, as well as the letters following it which may not have been addressed yet (such as the letters from Rieti).

I apologize for this last delay - I graduated and moved, and have been very busy looking for work and working on various projects associated with the move.  As before, however, despite this delay I'm still up for our game as long as we've got the players to run it.  Thanks for your patience!
Logged

The Clockwork Jungle (wiki | thread)
"The impediment to action advances action. What stands in the way becomes the way." - Marcus Aurelius

Pages: 1 ... 120 121 [122] 123 124 125
  Print  
 
Jump to: