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Author Topic: The Republic Reborn  (Read 185650 times)
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« Reply #930 on: December 25, 2012, 01:53:08 PM »

Orders

-Bring all my men with me to help Basile
-Hire 100 extra light infantry for scouting
-Try and purchase/invest land surrounding Nettuno, Aredea and the Collosseum. Preferably forested land that contains good timber for ship building.
-Do my best to ensure that the vile baron dies, preferably in combat, and does not make it back to Rome to face the courts.
-Try and purchase and/or claim any lands I can from the barons
-Throw my weight behind the Arnoldists movement in the Senate. Spend up to 3 WP if needed
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« Reply #931 on: December 27, 2012, 06:57:49 PM »

Anno Domini MCLVI
Summer has passed into Autumn…
In autumn, laborers take to the farmlands to plow the fields and sow the winter wheat, while in the hills grapes and olives must be picked and pressed.  This is a busy time in Rome, for much work needs to be done between the withering summer and the onset of winter.  The wealthy return to the city from their country estates this season, and the Church prepares for the celebration of All Saints’ Day.  On the water, merchants hurry to complete their routes before the winter storms make the sea treacherous, and citizens watch the Tiber warily, for floods come most often in autumn

Our Consuls: To Be Determined
Our Pope: Adrian IV
Our Rage: Seething [4]

This Season’s Top 5 Popular Issues

1. "Hurrah for Arnold!  Drive out Boso and the Papists!"
2. "Let the Normans and Papists kill one another – the better for us."
3. "It is time to restore justice in Rome."
4. "We won’t stand for another tyrannical Prefect!"
5. "We don’t trust these foreign Ebreo…"

News from Abroad

Friedrich “Barbarossa” von Hohenstaufen, Holy Roman Emperor, has married Béatrix d’Ivrea, Countess of Burgundy, who inherited the county from her late father Renaud III as his sole child in 1148.  Though it may be some time before she may give her lord an heir (being only 12 years old), this marriage is tremendously advantageous to the Emperor, who now gains control over the large and wealthy County of Burgundy and expands his direct influence into the Kingdom of Burgundy, an integral part of the Empire that has nonetheless been largely autonomous in recent decades.  The Emperor has, furthermore, formally proclaimed himself as sole augustus of the Roman Empire – a clear slight against that other so-called Roman Emperor, Manuel Komnenos.

In other news of Germany, the Emperor has named his younger brother Conrad as Count-Palatine of the Rhine, and has appointed the Saxon ecclesiastic Rainald of Dassel as Imperial Chancellor.  Rainald was near Rome in 1153, when he formed part of the Imperial delegation to the late Pope Eugene III to negotiate for Frederick’s imperial crown.

Ramon Berenguer II, the young Count of Provence, has won a decisive victory against Hughes II, Lord of Baux, in the long-standing struggle over control of Provence between the Catalan House of Barcelona and the Occitan House of Baux.  Though Hughes has been recognized as lord in Provence by the Emperor himself, the Catalans have ignored every Imperial decree and have now forced the Lord of Baux to relinquish Castillon and several other important castles to them.  Only the Lordship of Baux itself remains to Hughes, and even this may now be threatened by the expansion of Catalan power in Provence.

The African city of Sfax has taken advantage of the continuing civil war in Sicily to rebel against its Norman rulers, driving the garrison from the city and proclaiming their allegiance to the Almohads!  It is said that hundreds of Christians, including even women and children, were slaughtered by the perfidious Saracens.

Pisan sailors from Civitavecchia have been heard to say that Muhammad, amir of the Balearic Isles, has recently died.  Muhammad, of the tribe of Banu Ghaniyah, was the governor of the Isles under the Almoravids, and when that dynasty fell to the fanatical Almohads he proclaimed himself amir of Majorca, the last redoubt of the Almoravid Empire.  He is succeeded by his son Ishaq.

André de Montbard, Grandmaster of the Knights Templar, has died after less than three years in office.  Bertrand de Blanchefort, of Gascony, has been elected to succeed him.

News of Italy

The Greek expeditionary force under sebastos Iohannes Doukas, along with the Norman rebels led by Count Robert of Bassonville, moved to attack Brindisi in May, one of the last major strongholds of the royalist forces in Apulia.  As they besieged the city, however, word came of a great force moving against them – William de Hauteville, King of Sicily, had taken up arms and now personally led the royal army against the Greeks and their treasonous allies.  At the same time, the Sicilian fleet sailed to Brindisi on the coast to confront the Greeks at sea.  It was then that disaster struck – his Anconese mercenary knights, seeing the great host arrayed against them, demanded a massive increase in their pay.  Either Doukas could not or would not comply – it remains uncertain – but subsequently the Anconese, who made up the majority of his cavalry, shamefully deserted his army.  Count Robert abruptly abandoned the Greeks as well, leaving them completely outnumbered by the royal army.  Doukas unwisely held on to his position, hoping that reinforcements would arrive in time.  He waited in vain.  On May 28th, the larger and superior Sicilian army crushed the Greeks at Brindisi, and Doukas himself was reportedly captured.

This is, in any estimation, a tremendous loss for the hopes of the Greeks in Apulia – already William has begun reclaiming land taken from him by the Greeks and their allies over the past year.  The Greek cause, however, is not completely lost.  The megas doux (commander of the Greek navy) Alexios Komnenos Bryennios arrived with his fleet too late to save Iohannes Doukas, but he did bring several thousand new troops.  Though the Greek fleet was subsequently driven off by the Sicilians, they were able to land this new force, which gathered what was left of Doukas’s army and withdrew to Bari, where the new Greek governor of the city, sebastos Kosmas Bariotes, is now in command.  Though the situation looks grim, the Greeks still retain control of the strong cities and fortresses of the Apulian coast, and may yet be able to hold out for further reinforcements.

Meanwhile, another decisive battle was fought well north of Rome.  Determined to aid his Pistoesi allies to the north, Count Guido Guerra and a sizable Sienese army marched north to seize the strategically important bridge of Signa, one of the few bridges over the Arno.  The Florentines were equally aware of its strategic value, and raced to reorganize their army to repel the attack.  The Florentine army managed to steal a march on the Sienese and arrive at Lastra, just south of Signa, before their enemies.  The Florentines were exhausted and ill-prepared for battle, but the count and the Sienese leaders delayed – they were not in good order for battle and many of their mercenaries had yet to arrive.  They only attacked two days later, giving the Florentines time to recuperate and strengthen their position.

The Florentines assembled great solid blocks of spearmen, with a hastily-dug ditch before them to slow down any assault, and thin skirmish-lines of archers and crossbowmen just behind the ditch.  At their center was the carroccio, an ox-pulled wagon bearing the great banner of Florence, the crimson lily, from which the priests of the Florentines led their troops in prayer on the morning of the battle.  After prolonged skirmishing, the armies clashed.  The count’s cavalry struck the Florentine lines, but the militia would not yield and the horsemen were driven back.  Then they were pressed upon by the Sienese footmen and mercenary infantry, who substantially outnumbered the Florentines, but still the Florentine militia held, and the Florentine cavalry resisted any attempt by Count Guido to draw them away from the flanks of their infantry.  By nightfall, the count and the Sienese had nothing to show for a day of furious bloodshed, and withdrew to the hills, while the Florentine cavalry harried their retreat and fell on any stragglers or wounded men.  With the Guerran-Siennese advance stopped dead in its tracks, the Florentines drew back to Signa to hold the bridge.  With their hopes for timely relief dashed at Lastra, the Pistoesi garrison of Carmagnano surrendered to the Pratesi in early August, dealing a second setback to the ambitions of Count Guido and his allies.

It has been reported by Jews recently arrived in Rome from Africa that the Republic of Genoa has signed a commercial treaty with the wicked heathen Abd al-Mu'min, Caliph of the Almohads, notorious for his persecution of Jews and Christians alike.

News of Latium

Several hundred Romans under the command of Consul Roberto Basile struck towards Ardea in a campaign to punish Signore Luidolf of Ausonia for his alleged attack upon Basile's son, Ricardo, and his bride, Caetana Caetani.  One cavalry skirmish was the only armed confrontation to take place, and the baronial resistance against the Caetani soon dissolved.  Gisulf, however, has taken refuge with Gionata, the Count of Tusculum, who has promised justice but has delayed the delivery of Gisulf to the Romans until he receives word from His Holiness... [For more information, see Campaigns below.]

A skirmish was reported just east of Rome in early June.  A group of armed riders apparently attacked a small torre within the Roman contado known locally as “Trescapita.”  Details are scarce, but the attackers appear to have been themselves ambushed by another band of horsemen waiting nearby, and driven off with heavy casualties.  It has been reported since then that the tower may have been the hideout of Niccolo Capocci.  Though many expected the “Labarum Barons’ War” to heat up considerably after this event, there were seemingly no retributive raids – the lands north of Rome have been strangely calm, and no further baronial raids were reported this summer.

In early July, Theodoric of Alsace, Count of Flanders, finally took his leave from Rome with his wife and army.  Rumor has it that they had been delayed by their inability to pay the Anconese for their last-minute naval arrangements, but they clearly must have come up with the money somehow.  They were missed not at all by the Romans, particularly after an altercation between a Flemish man-at-arms and a Roman peddler led to a brief riot in S. Angeli in Foro Piscium on July 25th.  The Flemings departed on the Via Flaminia but came into conflict with Niccolo Anguillara, Count of Magliano, who – probably fearing for his property – prohibited them from crossing the Ponte Augusto across the Tiber.  Growing weary of delays, Theodoric seized the bridge by force, took Signore Anguillara’s men as hostages, and encouraged his army to help themselves to Magliano’s fields until, safely in Umbria, he let Niccolo’s agents walk back to Magliano naked.

News of Rome

Legislation to guarantee the safety of the monastery of Tre Fontane from Roman intervention and taxation, introduced by Senator Arrigus Sismondii, was narrowly defeated in the Senate.  An amendment, put forward by Senator Manzinni, that the Senate receive the initial profits from any ventures with the monastery failed to sway the opponents of the guarantees.  Consul de Vinti, perhaps mindful of his political future, opposed the agreement when it was clear no broad consensus was possible.  While Senator Calafatus was the most vocal opponent of the guarantees, his influence was probably minimal – the Arnoldists, who loved him, were already against the agreement, while those senators who were inclined to favor the agreement were uninterested in what he had to say.  With Consul Basile, arguably the most influential man in the government, standing aloof, Sismondii’s faction was eventually forced to admit defeat by a close margin.

In the weeks after the vote, not a few senators on the losing side admitted it had been a debacle – without gaining anything, Sismondii had handed the Arnoldists a free propaganda victory in the Senate, and relations with Rome’s higher clergy (not to mention Tre Fontane itself) were greatly strained by the Senate’s apparent bad faith towards its ecclesiastical neighbors.  The vote seemed to only further divide the senate, with accusations of bribery and corruption being thrown by both sides.

Arnold of Brescia, recently returned from exile in Naples, has renewed his work in Rome with a vigor not seen since the heady days of the overthrow of the Patricianate.  Over the summer months, he seemed to be everywhere in Rome, preaching on the steps of the Pantheon, on the shores of the docks, before the Senate house itself, and in dozens of the piazzas and avenues throughout the city.  The thrust of his sermonizing was the same as ever – that no man of the clergy is saved, nor has any power to save others, who owns property or possesses any regalia – though he also aroused comment and controversy by criticizing the Crusades, arguing that in the days of Christ’s disciples the Word of God was spread not by arms, but by poor fishermen.  He has also given a stern warning to the Romans, urging them not to grow complacent and rest easy on their liberty now that the “Englishman” is away in Benevento, and to be watchful for the tyranny and injustice of false and avaricious clergymen.

During his sermon before the Pantheon, when Arnold again forcefully denied the efficacy of priests who own property to save souls, the anguished crowd cried out to him asking how then they might be saved.  Arnold quoted to them from the Epistle of James, saying “confess your sins to one another, and pray for one another to be healed, for great is the power of the prayer which a righteous person prays.”  Since then, it has been reported that groups of Arnoldists all over the city have begun congregating in private homes to confess their sins, sometimes to pro-Arnoldist priests and sometimes simply to laymen judged to be good and righteous men.  Some scurrilous rumors even claim that some women, who make up a large portion of Arnold’s followers, have made confession to their fellow women.  It is doubtful whether this alarming new trend, contrary to Church teachings, was fully intended by Arnold – in his sermons he does not contest the doctrine that salvation comes only through the Church, just that it cannot come through worldly priests – but his opponents complain bitterly that he has not tried very forcefully to stop it.

A ship landed at Civitavecchia in July carrying nearly a hundred Jews from Africa who had fled the oppressive rule of the heathen Almohads and sought to join the Jewish community in Rome.  They arrived with whatever possessions they could squeeze aboard their already overcrowded ship, and even these were reduced considerably by the Pisans, who reportedly exacted exorbitant fees from the refugees before they would allow them to disembark.  After this was done, the Jews proceeded to Rome where they were received by their brethren in Trastevere.  Many Romans came out to gawk at the foreign Jews, whose clothes are like those of Saracens.

Campaigns


Finances

Treasury: 5 WP

State Projects:
  • Aqua Virgo Repair [15/15]
  • Porta Asinaria Repair [8/10]

Income: 2 WP
  • Duty, Patrician Pierleone: 1 WP
  • Papal Stipend: 1 WP

Expenditures: 0 WP


Senatorial Inquests

Senators that requested information or launched endeavors have the results of their efforts listed here.  This information is private, but you may certainly choose to share it with the Senate.







Update

Behold, the last update of 2012.  As usual, inform me if any corrections must be made.  Letters, elections, and a new Roman unit will follow.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2013, 02:38:12 AM by Polycarp » Logged

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« Reply #932 on: December 27, 2012, 07:08:57 PM »

Consular Election of 1156

Senators, it is time to decide who will lead our glorious city in the coming year!

 

Election Rules

All PCs are eligible for Consular status, though a character who wins an election may choose not to accept the position if he so desires.  All PCs are eligible to cast a ballot, though casting a ballot is not mandatory.

Each character has a number of votes equal to his Influence score.  When you cast a ballot, you must choose how these votes are allotted.  You may spend all your votes on one candidate or split votes between candidates however you wish.  A ballot should be in a red OOC box like this one, and be in this format:

Election of 1156

Your Senator’s Name

4 votes to Senator X
2 votes to Senator Y

The ballot is not secret.  Who voted for whom is in-character information known by all.  The whole Senate, all 100 members, takes part in this vote; our game simulates this using Influence, meaning that when you “cast a ballot” it actually represents your character and his friends and/or family actively cajoling and convincing NPC senators to vote your way.  This is a tedious process of pandering speeches, cloying flattery, empty promises, and boring dinner parties, and is by definition not a private matter.

Bribery, specifically the expenditure of Wealth to buy votes, is permitted.  Bribery will alter the final count of votes, depending on how much Wealth was spent.  Bribery works by  “stealing” one vote from a candidate of your choice and giving it to another candidate of your choice.  Stealing a vote in this way costs 2 WP.  It may be obvious that people were bribed if the final result doesn’t match who players actually voted for, but there will be no direct indication of who bribed them unless the bribery is discovered.

If the bribery is discovered, there will be a scandal resulting in a loss of Influence.  The chances of a bribe becoming a scandal are 10% for each vote bought.  Note that a scandal does not mean the bribe was unsuccessful – it is still possible to win an election by bribery despite a scandal, but the loss of Influence may make it difficult to hold on to power.

If you choose to bribe, it should ONLY be done by sending me a PM indicating how much you are spending and who the bribed Senators are supposed to vote for.  If you post a bribe in this thread, it will not be accepted, and I will laugh at you.  Bribes are non-refundable!

The two players with the most votes (after Bribery) are elected Consuls.  The Consul who receives the most votes has the privilege of deciding which Consul, external or internal, he wishes to be.  Ties will be resolved in favor of who has the most Influence or, failing that, a coin flip.

Furthermore...

To Hugo de Vinti

Signore de Vinti,

I must personally take some of the blame for the unhappy flight of my students from Rome; my translations and studies have left little time for immersion in politics, and flattered as I was by the interest of your honored consuls in my jurisprudence, I did not consider or understand the turbulent situation these young scholars were being sent into.  Upon their return they reported a city in much turmoil and divided against itself.  Surely the law is needed more in such a place than anywhere else, but my pupils were not the men to attend to such a daunting task.

Unfortunately, Signore, I am no better suited.  I am no longer a young man, and my duties here at the university absolutely preclude me from venturing elsewhere (I am, for one, completing a new comprehensive analysis of the legal forms and precedents of the dowry).  I have mulled over the matter with some of the faculty who studied under me, but to move from Bologna, where their skills are in great demand from intelligent young men all over Christendom, to Rome, that place of tumult, is not a prospect that stirs many of them to excitement.  Only one of my former pupils has expressed any interest in such a move.  I assure you that he is a superior scholar and one of the best students I have had.  I have enclosed his letter to you in case you should find it reasonable.

Peace and abundant prosperity to you and the most famous city of Rome,
Martinus Gosia, Doctor utriusque Juris

To Hugo de Vinti

Consul,

My mentor, the esteemed doctor Martinus Gosia, has made me aware of the unique plight of your city and the debacle of his earlier students who were your temporary guests.  My colleagues have strongly discouraged me from attempting to follow their example and respond to your request for assistance.  They say that Rome is an irredeemable backwater of fierce and contumelious people, and I cannot see much of a reason to disagree.  However, I see certain professional and personal benefits they do not, and it is for these reasons that I have decided to make you an offer of my own.
 
I believe that the essential problem is not one of some essential Roman nature but the failure of my predecessors, including unfortunately my illustrious mentor, to clearly establish a contract with the Roman consuls.  Flexibility in the law in the service of equity is praiseworthy; laxity in the province of negotiation and business is not.  Therefore I have drawn up a list of conditions upon which I will travel to Rome.  If these conditions are met in full, I will remain in Rome for no less than one year and devote myself to the schooling of literate men in the law of the Romans and the establishment of a school there.  As I have already judged these terms to be fair given the substantial risk posed by this endeavor to my health and my professional advancement, I will unfortunately not consider any negotiation on the following points.

Firstly, that the Senate of Rome shall pay me [2W] in good silver coin, immediately upon my arrival, and furthermore make a donation of [1W] to the studio of Bologna, likewise in good silver.
Secondly, that the Senate shall provide me with private quarters, a lecture hall, and a study suitable to my needs; I require no luxury but space and good light are essential.
Thirdly, that the Senate shall appropriate or build a suitable facility for a school, to be approved by me, and make whatever payments prove necessary for this.
Fourthly, that the Senate shall fully provide for my material needs, which shall include but are not limited to bread, wine, olive oil, cheese, tallow and beeswax candles, firewood, decent bedding, parchment, ink, good goose and swan quills, desks and chairs, fish on Lent and feast days, a suckling pig and a fatted goose in winter, and two bachelor clerks in good health and literate in Latin, Greek, and the vernacular.
Fifthly, that the Senate shall in no way censure, suppress, or prosecute me for anything I should write or teach.
Finally, that if the Senate fails to honor this contract in any part, that I shall leave with my payment and trouble myself with the business of Rome no longer.

Please be so good as to inform me promptly of the Senate’s decision.

Rogerius Placentianus, Legum Magister

To the Senate, from Rieti

Honored Friends,

We maintain still the valued alliance between our two cities, and the heart of every man of Rieti stirs with patriotism in the remembrance of the blood we have shed together in defense of our cherished liberty.  Of course, a true alliance between peoples, as you will undoubtedly agree, is shown true in both war and peace alike.

We have grown concerned in the years since our mutual struggle against the grasping tyranny of the thankfully departed Abbot Anselm regarding the state of our defenses.  While the Reatini shrink from no fight and leap eagerly to the defense of their valued allies, our civic militia has demonstrated some potential room for improvement in matters of discipline and training.  In order to both safeguard our own liberty and to better aid the Romans, our dear friends, we ask that the Romans send to us a Captain and a number of seasoned men to direct the training of our militia and the education of our own commanders.  We will happily pay these men for their services ourselves; we merely ask the Romans to recommend and spare them for us.

Rector Damianus Truffa

New Unit

Palatini have been added to the list of Roman units.  Some characters’ personal forces have been converted to this unit type.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2013, 04:08:51 AM by Polycarp » Logged

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« Reply #933 on: December 27, 2012, 07:28:30 PM »

Such a cute couple...  wub



Though this painting is supposed to depict Frederick and his bride at their marriage, it's not entirely accurate - first of all, "Barbarossa" was said to be blonde with a red beard, not red all over.  More importantly, however, he was about 34 years old at the time - this was his second marriage - and Beatrix was probably 12 or 13, which you wouldn't know from how they're depicted here.

Anyway -

Vote time

Votes for the consular election are due no later than Wednesday, January 2nd.  Let me know if you require additional time.
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« Reply #934 on: December 27, 2012, 11:46:05 PM »

Before the Senate

Greetings esteemed senators,
I came to you months ago with the idea to reestablish peace and order in Rome. Our judicial institution has been manhandled (mistreated), our magistrate went corrupt as they did not know what was to be done and the Jus Politia shattered as the fierce Roman riots made their way, leisurely, to the Forum.

Several mistakes I have picked up, but I am a mere man. So I have called for assistance, and my call has been answered kindly, though not without its price. But who said restoring order in Rome would be a walk in the Circus?

In exchange for support and teachings in matters of law, the highly esteemed scholar of Bologna, Rogerius Placentianus, student of Martinus Gosia, only needs us pay a modest sum of [3 WP] silvers and that his teachings shall in no way be the target of censure. He shall not, also, be the target of oppression. Basically, he will be considered a favoured man in the Eternal City, impossible to touch, though it is obvious he will be giving more than taking.

He requires that a place of teaching be built, or provided if it already exists, so that he may instruct lettered man on how to administer justice according to Justinian Law. This, my brothers, is a small price to pay for such a service that will allow Rome to more properly prosper. What's more, I offer to pay the full base fee of [3 WP] in silver myself.

With the blessing of the Senate, I shall continue on this most important work, and bring to justice all miscreants and rebels who would have Rome Fall rather than Rise.

Thank you,

bows politely

Letter to Arrigus Sismondii

Senator Sismondii,
Although I abstained from voting in favor of the Tre Fontane deal, I wish to repeat my support for your endeavor. I'm not one for political ploys, to be entirely honest, but I do entertain the thought of remaining Consul this year. Hence why I did not vote in favor of the deal. I simply do not have enough influence at the moment to be able to change much concerning this matter. However, I think my speech might have had some people thinking, and they might be more lenient on such sort of deal at a later time.

As you know, the consular elections will be held soon. It is imperative, in this time of internal strife and foreign-but-near wars, that we choose our Consuls right. I will not take the subtle way; I wish to have your favor in the next elections.

Despise our early struggles as you entered the Lesser Council, we have, since then, nurtured a close relationship. You helped me, and I helped you. I know, deep inside me that your heart is of Roman make, and that your actions are driven by the prospects of prosperity for our dear city. To be fair, you are the only one whose attention could be stirred when I called for important discussions. And whether we agreed, or not, it is the most important fact; that you were attentive and brought to the table your vision of a better place for Romans.

Though it must be said, I think we have been like-minded more often than not.

Long live those who wish Romans only good things,
Hugo De Vinti


Letter to Vittorio Manzinni

Friend and Senator Manzinni,
I am aware that you must be sad, maybe even mad, that I didn't put my weight to push forth the Tre Fontane deal to success. Alas, the opposition was solid, and fierce, and my weight must only have pushed a little bit, but not enough I fear. Worry not, however, while they may be only words I say; I am fairly certain such a deal might be possible in the future, and some elements in the opposition will have learnt of their mistake.

I shall not wonder to your awareness of the consulate elections soon, for you are the one who warned me against a possible run by the good Fortis Calafatus. I hate to be direct, but I wish to obtain your favor in this election. With the city in constant turmoil, wars at our doors, choosing the right Consuls is of great significance at this time. It will determine whether Rome falls further or rises.

As you may have heard in the Senate, I have made great headway in matters of justice. Although far from over, and such is why I need to retain my position as Consul of the Interior for still some time.

Long live those who wish Romans only good things,
Hugo De Vinti


Letter to Barzalomeus Borsarius

Senator Borsarius,
You have replied to me with a clear and short answer; you wish me to tell you what needs be done, and you shall see for yourself if there is anything you may help with. I come up with such a request.

I have made headway in the matter of an eventual judicial institution. Perhaps even better, renowned scholars with whom I have had serious discussions are willing to organize teachings here, in the Eternal City, in the domain of law, notably the Justinian Law which we intend on making use of.

Obviously, I need backing in this; and this is not a call for help, but a call of duty. The Roman people cannot remain lawless as it is. Order and peace must be restored so that the city may properly prosper.

If you can assure me your support, I am willing to distribute some matters important to the domain of law to you, so that you may accomplish whatever goal you have set for yourself.

Long live those who wish Romans only good things,
Hugo De Vinti
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« Reply #935 on: December 28, 2012, 04:18:20 PM »

Before the Senate

Truly, Senator de Vinti, your generosity speaks well of your character and patriotism. I suspect none here in this Senate could oppose the establishment of a Contract with this Roger of Bologna, so that he might found a school for the instruction of the Romans in Law. With such educated men at our disposal, I am certain our Judiciary would be the envy of all the Communes of Italy, and so our prestige would soar ever higher.

I would therefor propose that the Theatre of Marcellus, which has long sat unused, be renovated to serve as this new Roman school of law. I further propose that funds from the Treasury of the Senate be released to to pay for this renovation. Certainly, Rome cannot forever impose upon Senator de Vinti's giving spirit.

Letter to Fortis Calafatus

Fortis,

As promised, I am prepared to throw my support behind you should you wish to seek the Consulship of Rome. In joining the Ardean Expedition you did me a great favour, for surely we would have faced stauncher resistance without the force of arms you delivered. I would thus return this favour, should you wish it. If it is not so your desire, I would then humbly seek your support in the election. Certainly, in either case, we cannot leave this election uncontested. I can think of nothing more disastrous than de Vinti at Rome's tiller, with the Geriatric Manzinni or the Avaricious Sismondii - or God forbid Barzalomeus Borsarius with his lunatic Catonian Zeal - charting the course.

Roberto

Letter to Shabbethai ben Moses

Shabbethai ben Moses,

As always, the peacefulness and industriousness of your congregation is a blessing unto Rome. I trust our recent immigrants are settling in, and that they will soon come to love the Eternal City as much as you or I. Concerning these new arrivals I have a rather innocuous - if unusual - request. The Saracens, though largely malicious heathens, are known to produce on occasion men of great knowledge and insight, particularly in the fields of medicine and alchemistry. Indeed, it has occurred to me that a man such as myself, who is invested considerably as a merchant of fish, should additionally be in the business of wondrous aroma in addition to those less wondrous. I have heard that among these Saracen scholars are some who have no small expertise in perfumery and aromatic medicaments. Notably Avicenna, Rhazes, and Alkindus, who have compiled considerable quantities of the knowledge of the extraction of scented oils and other compounds, and their combination for pleasurable effect. As our new immigrants have come from the lands of the Saracens, I wonder if they have brought with them any copies of texts by these noted scholars. I would of course appreciate if you could investigate this matter for me, and should you by chance be successful, if I could be given the opportunity to have a copy made.

Senator Roberto Basile

Consular Election of 1156

6 votes to Roberto Basile
« Last Edit: December 28, 2012, 07:24:49 PM by TheMeanestGuest » Logged

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« Reply #936 on: December 28, 2012, 05:18:09 PM »

To DaVinti- copy to Sissmondi

To Consul Hugo DaVinti:

I regret to inform you that I find your digressions and dissembling insulting and even more so worrisome do I find your lack of faith in your own power to gather support for the project. You are a consul who has won the respect and the support of many--to believe so little in the power of your word and your vote is to demean those who have supported you in the past.

And to have backed out and to have altered your vote at the final hour of the project without notifying others who threw their political weight behind the project perforce is to have booked a grand insult at those who expended their political capital to support the project.

The votes were there with your assistance to have caused the project to succeed. The closeness of the final tally makes that obvious. It would be understandable were you to have voiced concerns about the project to fellow supporters before the final tally and then to have retreated, but you did not even afford supporters the dignity to withdraw the proposition before humiliation.

This lack of thought for your fellow Senators leads me to one of two conclusions. Either you concluded a secret deal on the side at the final minute with the intent to spread humiliation among the Senators; Or, you lack respect enough for your fellow Senators to inform them of a change in your opinion and you are a weak Consul who lacks leadership qualities, who is unable to sustain your friends who have voted for you in the past, who have supported your leadership for these past years.

Indeed, you are correct, choosing the correct Consul at this time is of vast importance. Given your recent actions, I no longer believe you are the proper person to serve as Consul for Rome.

- Senator Vittorio Manzinni

To Senator Borsarius

Senator Borsarius,

Salutations. I understand you are a traditional man and as a traditional man I understand you do not tend to support the Arnoldist cause which threatens to plunge Rome into anarchy and economic demise should it return Rome to a state of war with Papal forces.

As such, I would like to stress to you my credentials of rebuilding churches in Rome, including Santa Maria, in which the Templars now reside. I also would like to stress to you that my [orthodoxy has gone up by 2 or 3 points in the past 3 years]. I have been a force for restoration and stability in Rome. I have mediated between Arnoldists and priests, I have encouraged economic growth and growth of personal character.

Unlike myself, Consul DaVinti has lent the Arnoldists a great victory by at first supporting a plan for Tre Fontaine, and then withdrawing his support without notifying his fellow Senators.  Consul DaVinti then had the gall to claim to me to ask for his support in the coming election. He also lacked the faith in his own power as Consul to have pushed the deal to a conclusion--he demurred that he changed his vote because his vote would have not altered the outcome. Yet, the vote was close even with his defection. This implies to me one of two things. Either Consul DaVinti does not remember his allies who voted for him and he views himself as ineffectual, which is a poor quality for a leader; or he deliberately betrayed the idea in order to strengthen the Arnoldist sentiment.

Whether or not you supported the Tre Fontaine decision, It is telling that Consul DaVinti not only abandoned his allies, but embarrassed them by altering his vote at the last minute without informing them of his intentions. These are not the actions of a man of honor.

Therefore, I find myself compelled to run against him for Consul. Rome cannot be governed by a person who abandons allies without a thought to their reputations, Rome cannot be governed by one who creates chaos by not permitting Arrigus to withdraw the dangerous vote before incensing the Arnoldists. Rome should be governed by a man who in his actions creates stability, and growth. It should be governed by a man who stood by his allies in hard times [He's referencing how he stood by DeRosa (Elemental Elf's character) when DeRosa got into a tiff with Basile and essentially fled into exile].

Therefore, I ask you for your thoughts and your support as I prepare to formally place my name into the vote for Consul of Rome.
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« Reply #937 on: December 28, 2012, 06:01:28 PM »

Letter to Vittorio Manzinni

Senator Manzinni,
I believe you are monstrously ill informed, for I have made my stance on this deal clear to everyone right from the start. I remember saying before the Senate that my vote in favour of this deal would come only if there was an overwhelming majority that supported it. Dividing the consuls, such as you suggest, in this matter was not a better move than to stay in a position of power to further help the cause at a later, more convenient time.

I have no lack of faith in my ability to serve as Consul, and to be an instrument to the betterment of our dear City. What I find worrisome is that you sit idly on piles of silvers and deign tell others of their supposed inabilities when so many people could make good of this wealth. For someone who has for title Senator of Rome, you use it with poor taste, and to the chagrin of all others who share this most prestigious title.

Insulting those who supported me in the past would have been to fight the wrong fight. You, Senator Manzinni, revel in looking at only the precise battles, but the whole war you forget.

I am sorry that you will distribute your favours to somebody who might not even have Rome's best intentions at heart, but if such is your definition of a wise move, I invite you to make haste and go forward with it. Though, in all honesty, I would ask that you reconsider.

Hugo De Vinti

Quoting myself, in a speech at the Senate floor last turn

"As Consul, I cannot approve of their requests if I am not hard pressed by the whole of the Senate..."
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« Reply #938 on: December 28, 2012, 06:06:50 PM »

Before the Senate

Colleagues,
I concur with the esteemed consuls in their endeavor to restore justice to the Roman courts. I firmly support the contract with Roger of Bologna and commend Consul de Vinti for his generous offer to fund the endeavor. Fellow merchants, let us attract trade to our city by reassuring the world that any contract made with a Roman is bound in iron and as valuable as gold. Let us bring peace to the mob by ensuring that we are governed by the rule of law. And let us remind those abroad that our lives and property, and those of our families, are protected by our institutions.

To Hugo de Vinti

Esteemed Consul,
I have given support to your proposition, as I find it agreeable with the principles of our city. If you could elaborate on what matters you intend to delegate to me, I will decide whether such responsibilities are appropriate for me to assume. I do note that, should you lose the consular election, such an agreement would be rendered pointless--do not expect this to ensure my vote. Be advised that should you renege on the payment of the contract or in any way jeopardize the process that is, at your hand, in its infancy, I will be inclined to vote against you, for the good of the people.

With respect,
Barzalomeus Borsarius

To Vittorio Manzinni

Senator,
Your words of warning are welcome, and I certainly understand the distrust that Consul de Vinti has garnered through his untimely change in attitude. Such wanton disregard for the process of policy and the disrespect of a coalition of supporters of the Tre Fontane matter is certainly distressing. As it stands, I support the Consul only on the matter of establishing a school of legal thought within Rome, and little else. As he is spearheading the effort for what appears to be crass political gain, I will monitor his involvement closely, but I cannot in good conscience publicly decry a man who offers to pay for a state good out of personal funds.

As for my vote in the consular election, I will admit that I am undecided. The consul's involvement and subsequent botching of the Tre Fontane matter make me disinclined to vote for him, though I am hesitant to cast my lot for an unknown quantity. You are a man of distinction and history, and I commend your forthrightness in disclosing de Vinti's questionable resolve. If you could elaborate as to what your priorities would be as consul, and especially what role you would take in furthering the establishment of our legal system, I would be more than willing to consider your candidacy in a serious manner.
With respect,
Barzalomeus Borsarius
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« Reply #939 on: December 28, 2012, 06:15:32 PM »

Elections 1156

5 Votes for Hugo De Vinti
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« Reply #940 on: December 28, 2012, 06:40:57 PM »

Letter to Manzinni; Copy to de Vinti

Gentlemen, from the letters I have received I see amongst us a quarrel arising that will serve neither us nor Rome any good. Let us not forget the true threat here. Senator Basile has helped block the bill I attempted to pass with great effort, even when he was unable to offer any viable reasons for why. I now suspect that he did so simply to garner political favor with the Arnoldists. Is this truly who we want at the helm of Rome? Even worse I have heard rumors of bribery on the part of Senator Calafatus and I personally would not put it beyond his capabilities to do so (let us not forget the incident with the Patrician) and now it is possible he may run again for Consul. We must not permit the Arnoldists (who so greatly seem to desire chaos and rash action) to have such power in the senate.

I propose an alliance amongst those of us who have not yet been swept up in this madness. If we work as one we can yet turn back this foolishness of theirs. True it was not to my liking that Consul de Vinti backed down on the matter of Tre Fontane but I do respect the knife's edge he had to walk and he has shown in the past that he is a faithful friend. I would not deny him my support in this election. I also would support you, Senator Manzinni. You have proven yourself true as well in the past. I propose that the three of us see the two of you elected. I would also suggest that we discuss this with Senator Borsarius who has not yet been here long enough to feel the twisted influence of Calafatus and the Arnoldists. I will throw my influence behind the both of you if you will both work together on this. If Senator Borsarius will also support our noble cause then we might yet have total victory in this and restore some sanity to the senate.
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« Reply #941 on: December 28, 2012, 07:15:04 PM »

To Senator DaVinti

I believe we both, and many observers, interpreted your statement, in the context of your entire speech which was aimed at supporting the project, very differently. The whole of the Senate is not Consul Basile and a few allies. When I made my speech, it appeared that the project very much was like to go forward and that you very much were behind it, obviously in rhetoric, but also in action-you said you would do as the Senate suggested and that you supported the project. The proper action would have been to avoid embarrassment for your supporters- to clarify where you really stood- and to have not handed a political victory to Fortis, the Arnloldists and Basile. [OOC: given that Fortis voted at the last minute in game-time, in-character it appeared that only one of the Senators who counted opposed the solution; out of character It seems I misinterpreted your meaning, but I'm going with what it appeared to be in-character, so I'm not mad as a player, just as a character] Additionally, it is not awe-inspiring to have received a note from you, a Consul, indicating that you lack faith in being able to lead Senators to back your projects. It is not awe-inspiring to hear that you will treat an ally properly only when you have nothing to lose--that you will not stand by your supporters like Arrigus when political expediency dictates otherwise, and that you have such great fear that you cannot persuade Senators to support your political positions.

-- Senator Vittorio Manzinni.

To Both DaVinti and Arrigus

I do respect that Consul DaVinti has been required to make hard decisions as a Consul that Senators do not need concern themselves with. I also respect that Consul DaVinti has expended sums of money in support of this City, sums that he did not need to contribute. I am willing to meet with the two of you and with Senator Borsarius if you can arrange such a meeting to air out concerns and to discuss a path to prosperity for Rome especially in the wake of the rise of the Arnoldists and the arrival of Senator Calafatus' troops on the doorstop of Rome.

My position, politically, has always been that the stability and economic progress of Rome is paramount.
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« Reply #942 on: December 28, 2012, 07:23:48 PM »

Letter to Roberto Basile

Senator Basile,

I do not seek re-election at this time, I believe my time will be better spent dealing with other matters while Rome is at a relative peace. However, as always, you have my full support in this Consulship.

Votes

4 Votes to Roberto Basile
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« Reply #943 on: December 28, 2012, 07:34:05 PM »

Response to Manzinni; Copy to De Vinti

I would support a meeting of our minds on this matter. Perhaps also we might invite Senator Borsarius to our meeting. Between the four of us we might surely find stability for Rome. If the both of you would be willing I would like to invite you to a dinner at my estates tomorrow night where we might discuss the approaching election.

Letter to Senator Borsarius

Greetings Senator, we have not perhaps been properly introduced. I regret that I did not sooner contact you then to properly welcome you to the inner council. Already it seems you have sought out how to do some good for Rome. With the current matters involving Basile, Calafatus, and the unruly Arnoldists I suspect I may have a way in which you might aid Rome. If you would give to me the honor of hosting you at my estates for dinner tomorrow night I might further explain to you the issues at hand and my plans for how to bring more stability to Rome.

Regards,
Senator Arrigus Sismondii
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« Reply #944 on: December 28, 2012, 08:16:58 PM »

To Roberto Basile

Good Senator,

The distinguished names you write are known to me and to the learned among our community.  Our brothers recently immigrated from Africa could take little with them, alas, and what they had was largely taken by the Sicilian merchants who supplied the ships and the Pisans who taxed them upon their landing.  There is only one such text that I know of among them, the knowledge of which was volunteered to me by Melloul ben Hazan, a doctor among the newcomers, who has an incomplete copy of the Kitab Al-Asrar by the distinguished Rhazes.  I am sorry to say, good Senator, that he is somewhat stubborn with regards to sharing this writing, as he is incensed by the seizure of his instruments and glassware by the Pisans at Civitavecchia, and has refused to part with anything further.  I am unsure if he would be amenable to payment; unfortunately the tools he has lost cannot be replaced here.

Of course, Senator, the place of the greatest such learning is surely not amongst our community in Rome nor among these exiles, but in Salerno, the city of the great school of medicine where many of the most distinguished healers and natural philosophers of our people and yours from both Italy and Africa have traveled to gain their education.

Shabbethai ben Moses
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