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Author Topic: The Republic Reborn  (Read 187278 times)
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« Reply #825 on: September 03, 2012, 11:38:18 PM »

Orders

- Invest 2 WP in my fishery.
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« Reply #826 on: September 05, 2012, 12:49:30 AM »

To Capocci

You are not a Consul of Rome, nor a member of its Senate. Why should I listen to your rambling about past deeds whose accomplishments have brought us all these hardships today?
You will not officialy hold these territories, nor will you present yourself to me again. Insulting me and questioning my methods is not your place, be I a merchant or a noble.
This matter will not be settled in violence, and should I lose my case, I'd prefer the Roman popolo remain safe rather than pit them against all the Papacy and their greedy lackeys.

Besides, if this sumptuous palazzo of mine so disgusts you, for it does not belong to the nobility, perhaps you should plan on taking a castle of your own instead of having your friendly merchants plan their retaking in your place.
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« Reply #827 on: September 05, 2012, 12:54:24 AM »

Note

I changed my order for the forgery of the Ad Gallinas Albas. It will still be made under Niccolo Capocci's name, but that, whether he likes it or not.
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« Reply #828 on: September 18, 2012, 11:01:11 AM »

Hey Polycarp. I know you are really busy, but I must admit I'm craving for some RR these days... I miss it!

Do you have an ETA on when you should be able to present an update?
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« Reply #829 on: September 19, 2012, 01:28:29 AM »

I think the history of RR has demonstrated that when I give you an ETA, I tend to break it, which is why I have avoided doing that.

I've mentioned the source of my problem on chat, but it probably deserves mention here too - one of the professors I work for is out for medical reasons, saddling me with a number of classes that I don't normally assist with.  I'm also going to be on vacation over the weekend.  The best I can do is assure you that I am still working on it, and when it is done, I will post it.
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« Reply #830 on: November 11, 2012, 11:41:12 PM »

Anno Domini MCLVI
Winter has passed into spring…
Spring in Rome is awaited with great eagerness, for it is Holy Week leading up to Easter in which the great annual flood of pilgrims pours into the city.  While some are barefoot and penniless penitents, others are wealthy knights and burghers from all over Europe coming to marvel at the churches and relics of Rome and pay through the nose for accommodations, guides, and souvenirs.  In the fields, peasants are clearing ditches, fixing roofs damaged in winter, and planting summer crops like millet in fallow fields.  In the pasturelands, the sheep are shorn before the flocks return to the hills.  After Easter comes the traditional “campaign season,” lasting until late summer when the peasants are needed back on their fields for the harvest.

Our Consuls: Hugo De Vinti and Roberto Basile
Our Pope: Adrian IV
Our Rage: Simmering [3]
 

This Season’s Top 5 Popular Issues

1. "Bring back Arnoldo!"
2. "Let the Normans and Papists kill one another – the better for us."
3. "We ought to do to Viterbo what we did to Tivoli!"
4. "We’ve been cheated by the traitorous Equites!"
5. "It is time to restore justice in Rome."
News from Abroad

In case the war in Sicily was insufficient, a new war appears to be looming in Italy, this time well north of Rome.  Guido Guerra, Count of Modigliana and one of the major feudal landowners in Tuscany, has long nursed a grudge against the commune of Florence; the Florentines despicably destroyed one of his castles while he was in the Holy Land on crusade, and earlier this year they arrested and imprisoned his own mother to try and force him to cede certain territories.  Count Guido has been busily building an alliance against the Florentines ever since Emperor Frederick von Hohenstaufen released him from captivity in Spoleto, and he has received pledges of support from the communes of Siena, Marturi, and Pistoia, as well as Count Alberto of Prato, who is eager to punish those vassals who have traitorously sided with the Florentines against him.  It is rumored that villages near Florence have already come under attack from Guido’s alliance, but the conflict may soon expand far beyond the environs of Florence.  The commune of Lucca has pledged to protect Florence against any aggression, and the commune of Pisa has never yet passed up an opportunity to enter a war involving Lucca, its mortal enemy.  Considering Lucca’s recent trade agreement and alliance with Genoa, there is no telling how broad the scope of this conflict could become…

Though the Greek army in Apulia has conducted no major campaigns in the winter season, a small Greek force assisted Alexander of Conversano, a rebel Norman lord, in the capture of the cities of Gravina and Montepeloso, which he had formerly ruled before being deposed and exiled by the late King Roger.  In January, however, the Greeks were struck a heavy blow by the unexpected death of their senior commander, strategos Michael Palaiologus, who passed away at Bari.  It is unclear how he died, though some snicker that it was likely from too much wine, for the general seems to have had a reputation for excessive drinking.  His deputy, Iohannes Doukas, has assumed command of the Greek force.

Word has reached Rome in only the past few days of an attack on the royalist-held city of Naples; according to rumors, raiders stormed the walls and burned a Genoese fleet in the harbor before being driven back.  If true, whoever perpetrated that outrage will likely want to stay away from the coastline for the near future…

News of Latium

The conflict among the barons north of Rome paused with the coming of winter, and continued without any breach of the peace until the first day of February.  It seems that Rodolfo, the son of Pietro of Ficedula, an ally of Signore Luidolfo of Rubino, was on his way to Rome for the celebration of the Feast of the Purification of the Virgin (better known as Candlemas) on the following day when his small traveling party was attacked on the road just south of the Ponte Milvio.  Rodolfo escaped, but one of his retainers was killed in the skirmish.  Signore Pietro has publicly accused Niccolo Capocci of being responsible for the attack, and vowed retribution against him and any who support him.

News of Rome

A delegation from the village of Acilia arrived in December.  The sindaco brought a petition before the Senate offering the friendship of Acilia’s people and requesting the aid of the Senate, so that they might receive the same manner of boons their neighbors in Gregoriopolis had.  Having no literate men among them, the leaders of Acilia had paid a monk to write the Senate a letter, but when they received a reply, they decided that it would be wiser (and cheaper) to simply go to the Senate in person to plead their case.  The sindaco has humbly asked that the Senate purchase a water-powered grist mill for their town, arguing that with a modern mill they could better provide bread and ale for travelers on the road between Rome and Gregoriopolis; at present, they pay fees to use other mills further away, such as the mill owned by the monks of Tre Fontane, and not having to pay such fees would greatly help their livelihood.  They estimate that a good mill would cost [2W].

The Senate of Rome has adopted new procedural rules.  Firstly, the Senate declared its ability to veto a consular decision with a two-thirds majority.  The measure was passed by acclimation, with no vote necessary, though afterwards there was disagreement about what two-thirds actually meant – two-thirds of the whole body, or two thirds of those actually present?  Fearing that a minority party might sneak in the Senate to veto Consular decrees against the will of the majority, the Senate subsequently clarified the veto to require two-thirds of all members.

Secondly, the Senate voted on establishing a means to select new senators; elections have not been held since Patrician Pierleone was overthrown and the new senate established.  The vote on a new means to elect senators was contentious, with various factions arguing furiously for days.  No faction made much headway until a surprise vote on January 15th, when a thunderstorm was raging over the city; due to the weather, the turnout of senators was lower than usual, and with only 60 members present the Senate finally broke the deadlock with a bargain between the equites and fourteen middle-class senators.  The vote established that:

  • The number of equites seats is fixed at twenty-two, where it currently stands.
  • Each senator may select his own successor, provided the successor is a Roman citizen of “good repute.”
  • No seat held by an eques may be willed to a common citizen, nor vice versa.
  • If a senator selects a successor not of his own family, the successor must be approved by the unanimous consent of the senatorial equites.
  • A senator may be expelled from the senate by a two-thirds vote; both Consuls must be present and preside over such a vote.
  • If a senator should be expelled from the Senate, his replacement shall be selected by the senators of his own class (i.e. equites or non-equites).
  • It is illegal for a senator to sell his succession rights for goods, land, or title, or have any business dealings with his selected successor, unless the successor is a member of his own family.
  • These laws cannot be amended save by a majority of both the equites and common citizen senators present.

When it became more widely known the next day, the bargain – clearly quite favorable to the equites – was denounced by many senators not present (and a few who were) for having been rammed through by only 34 senators (20 of the 22 equites and 14 others) thanks to a poorly-attended session.  Not a few senators alleged that the equites had bribed some senators to stay home, or paid off the “Devil’s fourteen” to vote with them.  Though technically in observance of senate rules, the January 15th vote has embittered many senators who note that the rules are now impossible to revise without the approval of the senatorial equites, who clearly have no intention of allowing such a thing.

Several minor (by Roman standards) riots have occurred in recent days, largely instigated by Arnoldists protesting the new Senate laws and the continued absence of Arnold, who some claim is being held prisoner by the Pope.  Other rioters are merely using the opportunity to agitate for the usual things – cheaper bread, death to the Tiburtini, and so on.  Though not yet a serious risk to public order, prominent Romans have urged the Senate to do something to keep the disturbances from getting out of hand as they have in several previous years.

Finances

Treasury: 4 WP

State Projects:
  • Aqua Virgo Repair [12/15]
  • Porta Asinaria Repair [5/10]

Income: 2 WP
  • Duty, Patrician Pierleone: 1 WP
  • Papal Stipend: 1 WP

Expenditures: 0 WP


Senatorial Inquests

Senators that requested information or launched endeavors have the results of their efforts listed here.  This information is private, but you may certainly choose to share it with the Senate.






Done!

Hello friends – yes, this is late, very late.  Still, I did say the update was coming, and here it is.  I apologize for not being able to give RR much time recently, and my busy, busy schedule isn’t nearly over yet, but at the very least you shouldn’t be forced to wait this long in the future.  If everyone is interested in continuing the game, then I’m still interested in running it.
« Last Edit: December 16, 2012, 01:59:03 AM by Polycarp » Logged

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« Reply #831 on: November 12, 2012, 12:04:02 AM »

Letter to Consul Basile

Greetings senator, the lord's blessing upon you and your house in the coming spring,

I have heard rumor of the great work you have done for Gregoriopolis and the promise it brings towards the improvement of the Roman market. As someone most vested in this market such a thing brings me joy and hope for the future of Rome. I suspect that this business with Acilia might have some interest with you especially as the growth of Gregoriopolis may open up the road to much trade, trade that will see itself moving through Acilia. It may be good to appease the Acilians, at least to get them off your back so that you may focus on more important endeavors. If you will put forward half of the cost of this mill they request I will cover the rest and see to it that they do not bother you or your men. Furthermore the good will you receive from this will only help you as you continue to work with the common men west of Rome.

Best Regards,
Senator Sismondii
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« Reply #832 on: November 12, 2012, 01:04:45 AM »

Population Report for 1155

The population of Rome stayed fairly consistent this year.  On the plus side, middle-class families who fled during previous years of violence were encouraged to return after the Papal reconciliation, as well as a number of noble families who were driven out a decade ago.  On the minus side, there were the 250 or so Romans killed during the Imperial coronation, as well as a few hundred fishermen and lower-class artisans who have moved out to Gregoriopolis to participate in the economic growth there; while these latter men no longer live in Rome, lowering the population number, they still are in some sense contributing to the Roman economy.  The result has been a slight increase in the citizen rolls, while the masses of non-citizens have declined to compensate.

Population: 28,100 (-100)
  • Equites: 400 [Citizens and nobles of households wealthy enough to bring a warhorse to the militia muster]
  • Popolo Grasso: 8,400 (+200) [Citizens of households wealthy enough to provide for a pedes, or infantryman, in the militia muster]
  • Popolo Minuto: 19,000 (-300) [Common subjects without political power]
  • Ebreo: 300 [Jews, exempt from military service]

Letter to the Lesser Council

Wise Senators,

Our community has received many letters in recent years from the Jews of Africa.  The Moorish lands, as you know, have been overrun by the conquering Almohads, who hate Jew and Christian alike.  In each city they conquer, every Jew and every Christian is forced to either convert or be slain.  Even those who profess the faith of the Almohads to save their lives are still persecuted, for the wicked Caliph Abd al-Mu’min has now proclaimed that every Jewish convert must cover his head with yellow cloth so they may be ridiculed, ostracized, and beaten.  Those that practice our faith in secret are terrified every day that they may be discovered and put to death.  For many, living under constant threat and humiliation has become intolerable.

Some of these families still in Africa are known to us as friends and kinsmen and have written letters asking if they may join us in Rome.  We have raised money for a merchant ship to take them from a Sicilian-held port and bring them here, and only ask from the wise Senate of Rome permission to make these arrangements and settle our persecuted brothers and their families in this great city.  I give you my word that these are good and upstanding men who fear God and know valuable trades, and that they have broken no laws save the cruel and unjust proclamations of the Caliph which I have mentioned.

Shabbethai ben Moses, leader of the Jewish congregation in Rome
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« Reply #833 on: November 12, 2012, 01:17:09 AM »

Letter to Shabbethai ben Moses

I have been made aware of your request and support your cause to rescue your people from these vile Infidels. I shall do what I may to convince the senate to likewise support you. Perhaps in turn you have information regarding any persecuted Christians in these lands. I, like you, would wish to see my brothers find safety if possible from such persecution.
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« Reply #834 on: November 12, 2012, 01:49:27 AM »

To Senator Sismondii

Honored Senator,

I give thanks to God for your generosity and wisdom.  Alas that I have never myself lived in Africa or otherwise under the dominion of the Mohammedans, otherwise I would be able to more competently give you an answer.  There are Christians in that land, of that I am sure; until last year there was even a Christian bishop in Kairouan, but since the wicked Caliph has taken that city I cannot say what has become of him.  He is not the only bishop in that land, for until this present calamity Christians and Jews were allowed to practice their religions in peace, so long as they paid a special tax to the Mohammedan rulers.  It is my understanding that many Christians and Jews of Africa have traveled to Mahdia and Sfax, which are under Sicilian protection, for the late King Roger was a wise and good man and was ever just towards all men, God bless him.  I am sure that if my brethren are permitted to join us here in Rome they will be delighted to give you a more detailed and satisfying answer.

Shabbethai ben Moses
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« Reply #835 on: November 12, 2012, 09:40:05 AM »

Speech on the Senate floor

Senators,
The recently voted senatoral succession law brought a few points to light. Before moving on to the subject matter which I mean to discuss, let me just say this: although the turnout on that session was small, the law was still passed legally. I realize some are frustrated, especially those who weren't present, but this -exactly- underlines why attending the senate sessions is important, and I hope that, in the future, the turnout on such crucial occasions will be bigger.

Moving on to the subject matter. The law brought a specific point to light which is that of citizenship. Right now it appears that only those capable of participating in the common defence are considered citizens of Rome. But I wonder, wouldn't the intellectual, whose researches might benefit Rome also be considered citizens? While we can pride ourself on our military abilities, I think we could benefit from having more scholars in our great city. The next generations could intellectually surpass our neighbours and rivals while also boasting a capable military, no doubt propelling Rome as the world's superpower once again.

Unless reforms are made to the way citizenship currently works, no advance on the technological level can be made and we will be forced to import knowledge. This might just be Rome's downfall. Of course I do not want to sound dramatic, but at the very least I think it's something that is worth considering.

I ask of you, esteemed senators, your thoughts on this.


Speech in the Lesser Council

Consiliariis,
We have the defence of our city at heart, and while external threats have been minimal to say the least, internal ones have perhaps multiplied. The Eternal City cannot afford constant riots. It would not be seen with a good eye; a great city, at the crossroad between economic powerhouses, where its own population gives itself to infighting and chaos. Order needs to be reestablished and preserved.

I propose a law be presented before the Senate that will make rioting less attractive an option for those discontented. Obviously, the Roman people is known for its fierce riots and opposition to those who hold power, and some here might think coming forward with such an idea is futile. We have to start somewhere is what my reply is to such defeatist sentiment.

Perhaps the simple creation of a peacekeeping force will be enough to dissuade rioters?
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« Reply #836 on: November 12, 2012, 09:59:56 AM »

Letter to Shabbethai ben Moses

Greetings,
I recently received with most heartfelt compassion your letter in the Senate. Obviously, the Almohad regime in Africa is case for concern if what you say is true. I can only hope that Christians and Jews alike be spared further atrocities.

I have no objections as to your families and friends coming over to the Eternal City should they wish a safe haven from the repression of the Almohads. I am sure they can also contribute to Rome's prosperity.

With Hope,
Hugo De Vinti, Consul of the Interior
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« Reply #837 on: November 12, 2012, 11:20:05 AM »

>>Perhaps the simple creation of a peacekeeping force will be enough to dissuade rioters?

OOC: I'm fairly sure we already have a peacekeeping force, unless it was disbanded? I seem to recall that Basile and Calafactus set one up in the early game; the drawback was tha the force usually was ineffective and was not too motivated to stop trouble. are you suggesting to fund that one more?
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« Reply #838 on: November 12, 2012, 12:37:37 PM »

LD

OOC: I'm fairly sure we already have a peacekeeping force, unless it was disbanded? I seem to recall that Basile and Calafactus set one up in the early game; the drawback was tha the force usually was ineffective and was not too motivated to stop trouble. are you suggesting to fund that one more?

Yes we had, yes it was and yes it was Basile who formed the force. It was only ineffective because they weren't motivated. They weren't motivated because they were mercenaries, thus they didn't have a feel of belonging. When the going got tough they fled like cowards and believe me if Hugo finds them he will put them to death if possible.

Now, OBVIOUSLY I don't want the same problem happening, but the truth is that we need a peacekeeping force to limit the riots because it's just crazy.
So we can put in place incentives so that individuals within the force are more motivated, and also pick these individuals not among mercenary groups but from the popolo so the sense of belonging  (nationalism) is there.

I have a plan as to how to organize this force, but unless there is discussion about the matter I will keep it to myself and act as I wish with it.
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« Reply #839 on: November 12, 2012, 01:38:02 PM »

Lesser Council

What is this peacekeeping force that the Consul speaks of? The Senate has had the experience of a peacekeeping force before. Does the Consul plan to re-form the force? I could support such an action, but the members of this force must be disciplined and they must perform properly in the face of a riot and they must serve the entire city instead of just one borough. Does Consul de Vinti wish to elaborate, or does he leave the matter to our Consul of the Interior, as this peacekeeping force seems to be a matter for internal governance rather than foreign affairs?

OOC: okay, I will move discussion to In character talk; I wanted to make sure first if you as a player had remembered Basile's previous force, since I believe he started it before you joined the game.
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