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Author Topic: The Republic Reborn  (Read 197191 times)
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« Reply #660 on: July 06, 2012, 06:22:23 PM »

Generally Known

Manzinni makes general support for this line of policy: "Other senators, particularly the nobles and equites, argue that trying to drive a wedge between the Pope and the King is likely to backfire, and caution against any bold invitations to the King considering his prior responses to Roman entreaties." Supporting Basile with what influence he has.

To Basile

Your words ring true, Senator Ambassador. Thank you for your cool head and caution in this endeavor. I will caution my allies to heed your advice of neutrality. Although Frederick would be useful as a sword, even if he sides with Rome, it is likely to end in the same way that a mouse might be ended when confronted by a pair of elephants.

Out of curiosity, did that disastrous of an encounter happen in real history?
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« Reply #661 on: July 06, 2012, 07:20:28 PM »

Quote

Out of curiosity, did that disastrous of an encounter happen in real history?

Yes, though I embellished it a little and filled in some of the details that the chronicles were silent on.  Adrian's speech is taken almost verbatim from the historical account.  The only obvious fabrication on my part is the presence of John of Salisbury, who was definitely not there (he was a prolific writer, if he had been there I'm sure he would have mentioned it).  He was, however, a personal friend of Pope Adrian who had been a Papal secretary around this time and made numerous trips to Rome on behalf of the King of England throughout this decade, so it's not inconceivable that he could have been.  (Though there was a translator present - Frederick could read some Latin, apparently, but his spoken Latin was horrendous.)

All the events I have planned are based on things that really happened - some closely, some loosely - but again, that doesn't necessarily mean they will play out in the same manner.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2012, 07:23:50 PM by Polycarp » Logged

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« Reply #662 on: July 07, 2012, 05:33:23 AM »

I should also note that, in addition to any other orders or decisions made this turn, it should be decided whether a delegate will be sent back to the Papal Curia now at Nepi.
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« Reply #663 on: July 07, 2012, 07:04:44 AM »

At The Senate

Indeed, neutrality should be observed in this matter. Running to one of them for favours is needless at this point; when they are about to run to -us- for some. When all cards are on the table, we can select the most promising option for Rome and the Romans.

I would think it wise to not send anyone to Nepi or Campo Grasso, lest we want to break the neutral stance we are adopting.

In the meantime, preparations should be made in the city, in regard to the events that unfolded at Campo Grasso. We wouldn't want to be caught unprepared.
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« Reply #664 on: July 07, 2012, 07:38:54 AM »

At The Lesser Council

Consiliariis,
It is my opinion that we have to prepare for the worst. The latest events between the Pope and the King in Campo Grasso leaves us with a few questions of what is to follow. Should the King give in to pride or excitation, we would not want Rome to be the target of any possible maltreatment.
I recently advocated a peaceful stance regarding our preparations for the arrival of King Frederick, but in light of the recent mishaps perhaps it would be best if we were to station men at strategic locations?
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« Reply #665 on: July 07, 2012, 02:24:27 PM »

Before the Lesser Council

We must always be prepared, Consul. But I do not agree that the outcome of this situation is in any way certain, and so we must be prepared for a multitude of possibilities, not only a single one. True, if relations deteriorate between our own government and either the King or the Pope to a point that the defense of our City by arms becomes necessary, we must indeed be ready for that. But so too must we be in readiness to conduct negotiation. We should not panic the populace, or show overt hostility, by summoning the militia as yet. I do not think it is yet time for such a display.
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« Reply #666 on: July 07, 2012, 04:47:44 PM »

Before the Lesser Council

I am in agreeance with Senator Basile on this matter. We must exercise caution in all that we do, a false step might bring insult to the wrong party or unnecessary fear to the people. Let us look to diplomacy before war. I believe that a delegate, whether it be Senator Basile or another appropriate member should return if able to observe. Information at this point is our most valuable asset. We should also I think prepare for negotiations of our own when the time comes. We should think on an appropriate way and place to host such delegations. I feel that we will soon be having them either with the pope or the king (or perhaps yet both).
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« Reply #667 on: July 07, 2012, 05:28:45 PM »

Letter to Enrico de Pisa

Your Eminence,

I apologize for my departure from the company of His Holiness following the events of the Campo Grasso. To my eye, neither His Holiness or the King seemed inclined to bear my continued presence, and so I departed from Sutri to bring word - as is my duty - to the Senate of Rome. I must admit to some confusion regarding the events as they occurred on that day, a sentiment that I noted seemed shared by the mass of the German army, utterly bewildered and jaws agape, following the departure of His Holiness. Perhaps it is not my place to inquire, but are relations between His Holiness and the King still of a sound and progressive nature? The Senate itself wishes to know if His Holiness still requires the presence of a delegate of the Commune in light of these events. If your response indicates the affirmative, I shall set out to rejoin the Curia at Nepi as soon as I am able.

Senator Roberto Basile

Orders for Event #2

If again allowed the status of official observer by His Holiness, travel to Nepi with a retinue of 20 of my armsmen so as to serve in that capacity.
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« Reply #668 on: July 07, 2012, 07:14:34 PM »

With only a few days between each event, I'm not going to give an immediate response to that letter; I would recommend writing conditional orders.  (If am allowed to observe, then...)
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« Reply #669 on: July 08, 2012, 11:29:34 AM »

Letter to Patrician Giordano Pierleone

Greetings Patrician Pierleone,
The Senate, as you no doubt may have guessed already, is somewhat confused by the latest reunion between the King and the Pope. Some wish to take a stance as quickly as possible, while others caution against that in fear that it might backfire. The Lesser Council judges the latter the wisest, and will maintain a neutral stance and a courteous diplomatic initiative until the situation becomes clearer.

As Consul, it would be my wish that you share matters discussed in your meetings that may have a serious impact on the affairs of the Republic. Let it be said that I will respect your decision should you decide not to reveal anything.

Sincerely,
Hugo De Vinti, Consul of the Interior
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« Reply #670 on: July 08, 2012, 12:07:51 PM »

Speech to the Inner Council

I believe the equites and the nobles speak truly. We should not interfere between the Pope and Frederick, there is too much risk for little to no gain. We must exercise our patience. We will send Senator Basile back to continue to observe the situation. We may take action at a later date. I would also strongly advise against preparing any kind of military, as that will be seen as a provocation by both the Pope and the Emperor. So for now, we should do nothing.
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« Reply #671 on: July 09, 2012, 04:25:13 PM »


The Arrival

Despite the enthusiasm among many common members of the Senate to take the opportunity of the "stirrup incident" to turn the King against the Pope, the senatores consiliarii sided with the reluctant equites and quashed any proposed diplomatic initiative.  The next day, a scout reported that the Teutons had advanced their camp six miles down the road towards Rome, on the shores of the little Lake Monterosi.  Senator Basile reached Nepi on the morning of the 11th, just as the Pope was preparing to leave the city and make another trip to the German camp; though nobody in the Curia looked happy to see him, he was begrudgingly allowed to accompany them yet again, and notably his armsmen were allowed to accompany them at least to the edge of the Imperial camp.  Patrician Pierleone informed the Senator that a messenger of the King had arrived that morning and said that, after discussions with his older knights who had accompanied past Emperors to Rome, the King had decided that the matter of the stirrup was indeed a legitimate ceremony and that he would perform it.

Once more, the Pope rode into the midst of the Teutonic camp, albeit to considerably less enthusiastic cheering on the part of the King’s knights.  The King was not seated at his throne, but stood a stone’s throw ahead of the royal tent.  When the Pope drew up to him, he gave a polite greeting, led the Pope’s horse to the tent, and held his stirrup as he dismounted; our observer reported that the King’s expression was decidedly grim during this remedial ceremony.  When it was done, however, the Pope took his throne (again), the King kissed his feet (again), the King gave the Pope the kiss of peace, and pledged that the Pope's enemies would also be his enemies.  The Pope, apparently satisfied, suggested that together they should ride to Rome and there crown the next Roman Emperor

The Teutons struck camp the next day and resumed their march southwards.  On the morning of the 15th, the Imperial army, Papal Curia in tow, arrived at the crossroads of the Via Francigena near the Milvian Bridge, and turned southwards on the Via Triumphalis, heading towards the Leonine City.

On a hill above the crossroads, the King spotted a stone wall; he asked the Pope what fortress that was, and offered to raze it if it belonged to some rebellious noble.  As nobody in the Papal party was certain to whom it belonged, however, the Pope demurred, saying that there were other fortresses nearby that were much more important.  With this, the King was satisfied, and the army marched on.

The army of the Teutons, estimated to be around 1,800 horsemen, is now encamped on the Campus Neronius (“Field of Nero”) just upriver from the Leonine city.  While the Teutons are not preparing a siege, they seem conscious of the possibility of a fight.  Their camp is not fortified, but has been laid out in a grid with wide avenues to allow the quick mustering of cavalry.

A herald from the camp has entered the Leonine City and was allowed by Patrician Pierleone to continue on to the Forum, where he delivered the following command to the Senate:

A Proclamation

“In the name of His Majesty the King, Friedrich von Hohenstaufen, rex Romanorum et Italiae, Elect of the Princes of the Empire; and in the name of His Holiness the Pope, Hadrianus, episcopus, servus servorium Dei; a delegation empowered to represent the Senate and People of Rome is summoned to the Royal and Pontifical presence.  The representatives of the city shall arrive tomorrow at noon and shall not be accompanied by men under arms.  The King swears in the name of Almighty God that these representatives shall, if they come in peace, be allowed to leave in peace.”

Event 2

It is now the afternoon of the 15th.  The Curia remains at the German camp, although Patrician Pierleone has left the Curial delegation and has returned to the Fortress of St. Angelo in the Leonine City.

Orders (optional, of course) and letters are due by June 12th.  If the Senate wishes to send a delegation, it must select who will be sent, and if there is to be a negotiation with the Pope it may be advisable to consider what general terms the Senate will propose and is prepared to accept.  As the King and the Curia are practically right outside the door, letters to anyone there will be answered immediately, unlike last round.

To Consul de Vinti

Consul,

My understanding is that the King was left with little choice in the matter and decided, however begrudgingly, to relent.  The situation now seems quite clear to me; the King, having acquiesced, will serve as the Pope's leverage over the Senate in exchange for his crown.  I cannot say how willing he will be to actually attack the city if negotiations fail.

Patrician Giordano Pierleone

In the Streets

Though Arnold has left the city, his student Wetzel seems to have stepped into his rhetorical shoes.  The ex-monk has been giving fiery speeches to the people denouncing the Pope and Emperor alike, saying that we must let no barbarian be crowned in Rome who would spurn the city and favor the avaricious and accursed Pope...
« Last Edit: July 09, 2012, 05:38:44 PM by Polycarp » Logged

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« Reply #672 on: July 09, 2012, 05:27:38 PM »

I forgot to include this with the update.  Thanks to Llum for accidentally reminding me smile

To the Senate of Rome

Roman Senators,

While the Honorable Consuls of Perugia urge a peaceful reconciliation with the King of the Germans, they are nevertheless prepared to honor their alliance.  I bear letters of introduction from the Consuls which will affirm that I have been placed in command of those members of militia of Perugia and its dependencies who have volunteered to aid in the defense of Rome, should it become necessary.  My column consists of 220 fighting men, including 30 armored cavalrymen, 140 pedites, and 50 crossbowmen; in addition, we are accompanied by 200 or so Reatini who joined our column near their city, though it must be admitted that they are poorly armed and do not strike me as very proper soldiers.  We are at present crossing the Aniene to the north of your city and would appreciate the arrangement of accommodations if the Senate intends to accept our assistance.

Antonio di Perugia
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« Reply #673 on: July 09, 2012, 05:47:07 PM »

Before the Senate

Friends it has ever been our duty to see to the protection and freedom of the Roman people. We must if at all possible avoid war with the king and the pope. Regardless of our reservations they hold power to do great harm to the people who we are charged with guarding. Thus we must approach this humbly and peaceably. However, if we are to protect the people we must also be firm and resolute. It has always been our desire to see that the Romans may manage their own worldly affairs separate of the church. Whatever we decide we must stand fast by the demand that the Senate, not the Pope be charged with the running of this city. If we must give concessions for this, whether they be in tribute or pledge of renewed vassalage, then so we must. Yet we must stand fast on the matter of the senate. It must be recognized as the sole and legitimate overseer and guardian of Rome herself. The pope may be seen as her spiritual shepherd and guide, but on worldly matters and the administration of the people and their city we must find legitimacy for the senate. If there cannot be this the only choice lays between war and suffering for the city or disbandment of the senate. I find neither of these choices acceptable.
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« Reply #674 on: July 11, 2012, 05:27:31 PM »

Hey guys, I would prefer if we could give until Friday at least for this update? Maybe I can do something for it sooner, who knows, but I'm pretty busy these times around.
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