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Author Topic: The Republic Reborn  (Read 189047 times)
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« Reply #360 on: March 30, 2012, 12:03:51 AM »

Letter to Cardinal Oddone Bonecase

Your eminence,

It brings me sorrow to see the passing of his holiness the Pope Eugenius yet I find peace in knowing that he even now is at the feet of our Lord Jesus. I wish nevertheless to offer my condolences. There has been much strife between The Papacy and Rome on matters of state and it is my hope that my brother Romans can put aside their anger to honor the life of Pope Eugenius and his great dedication to the faith of which we are all a part of. I assure you that I shall put all of my effort into helping insure that the funeral (which should be seen as an honor for Rome) goes peacefully.

Furthermore I wish to offer my congratulations to his holiness Pope Anastasius and wish him the peace and wisdom of god. It is my hope that some day soon Rome and The Papacy might fully reach an understanding between themselves and that we might receive each other with loving arms as is proper for brothers in Christ.

May you ever do the Lord's work and may he bless you in all that you do,
Senator Arrigus Sismondii
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« Reply #361 on: April 01, 2012, 05:18:30 PM »

*drools* ... moooaaaaaarrr... smile
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« Reply #362 on: April 03, 2012, 11:54:06 PM »

Anno Domini MCLIII
Autumn has passed into Winter…
Winter seldom brings snow to Rome, but the cold winter winds are accompanied by sudden storms.  Floods are still a danger, and only the most reckless mariners try their luck at sea this time of year.  In the countryside, vines are pruned and firewood is gathered, while craftsmen huddle indoors making and maintaining tools and equipment for the coming year.  The people fast through Advent before feasting at Christmas, upon a pig slaughtered in late autumn if they can afford it, and on wild game if not.  Epiphany is celebrated in January, and the date of Easter is announced to the people.

Our Consuls: Fortis Calafatus and Roberto Basile
Our Pope: Anastasius IV
Our Rage: Seething

This Season’s Top 5 Popular Issues

1. "The Emperor is coming!  Who will defend us?"
2. "Down with Pierleone!" "No, down with Calafatus!"
3. "Is it time to mend our fences with the Pope?"
4. "Arnold of Brescia is a great man.  We should protect him."
5. "The Senators and their Courts are corrupt."

News from Abroad

Rumors have spread of a treaty signed at Konstanz between King Frederick Hohenstaufen and a Papal delegation, involving a mutual alliance against – depending on who you ask – the Romans, Sicilians, and/or Greeks.  Though the Teutons and their king have yet to cross the Alps into Italy, Frederick’s promise to do so seems more real than ever.

Pilgrims returning from the Holy Land bring the joyful news that after a five month siege, the Fatimid fortress of Ascalon has fallen to the brave soldiers of King Baldwin III of Jerusalem.  The loss of the Egyptians’ most important frontier fortress and staging point for their invasions of the Kingdom of Jerusalem is surely a stinging defeat to the infidels.  The victory did not come without cost, however, and it is said the Grandmaster of the Knights Templar himself was killed in the fighting.

The Republic of Genoa, trying to resolve debts incurred by their Spanish crusade five years earlier, has been compelled to sell the Iberian city of Tortosa to the Count of Barcelona.  The Genoese had captured the city from the Moors in 1148.

The Emperor of the Greeks, Manuel Comnenus, is said to have quashed a treasonous conspiracy led by his cousin, Andronikos, who now languishes in some eastern dungeon.

Philip of Mahdia, the Admiral of Sicily who only earlier this year had led the Sicilians to victory against the Saracens of the Kerkennah islands, has been executed for apostasy.  Supposedly he was accused of converting to the Mohammedan heresy, but it is rumored that his death may have been part of an ongoing power struggle in the Sicilian court.  Some say that King Roger II is ill and that the power of the throne now lies chiefly in the hands of Maio of Bari, chancellor of the Sicilian kingdom.

News of Latium

Tolomeo II, Count of Tusculum and Prince of Latium, Illustrissimus, dominus consul et dux, is dead after taking ill with fever.  The comital title has passed to his eldest son Gionata, who rules jointly with his younger brother Raino.

It is reported that the Reatini siege of Rocca Sinibalda continues.  Though the castle’s best hope for relief was smashed by the Romans at Mons Elcinus, the Reatini appear to lack the equipment or organization to take the fortress by storm.  Most predict that the Reatini will not be able to continue the siege through winter, and many of the zafones have already abandoned the field.  The defenders of Rocca Sinibalda may only need to hang on for a few more weeks to claim victory.

News has arrived that in late summer, the communes of Bologna and Florence allied against the commune of Imola regarding a dispute over the destruction of a nearby castle last year.  Pope Eugene III had been mediating this dispute, but after his death, the Bolognese and Florentines led by the Bolognese podesta Guido di Ranieri di Sasso promptly attacked and defeated the Imolese in a pitched battle.  Imola has been subjugated by Bologna and reduced to a tributary.

News of Rome

The sensational trial of Consul Fortis Calafatus for seditious libel against Patrician Giordano Pierleone was the talk of all Rome, and his conviction in early September pushed the city closer to a perilous rift.  Though the judge, Senator Domenico DeRosa, declined to order the Consul’s death, he ordered that he should be stripped of his rank, his wealth, and exiled from the city for a decade, after which the Senate could consider restoring his status and fortune.

Before most Romans had even heard the verdict, Consul Roberto Basile seized the initiative and marched upon Calafatus’ estate with the vigili, his own masnada, and around two dozen equites.  By his order, Fortis Calafatus was placed under house arrest.  Though he was prohibited from leaving his residence, autumn passed without DeRosa’s sentence actually being executed.

The Roman Mob was not silent.  The day of the verdict, a mob of pro-Consul protesters gathered and attacked the Theater of Marcellus; when they realized that this had not been a Pierleonist stronghold for some months, they turned on the Forum.  Several senators holding court at the time fled for their lives, save one, who had the forethought to call for aid and then ride out to the mob to parlay with them.  His negotiations were fruitless, but they bought enough time for help to arrive in the form of three dozen Senatorial armsmen and a number of Roman Equites.  A brief scuffle ended in the deaths of four rioters and the dissolution of the mob.

For the next week, the Senate struggled to keep a lid on the roiling tensions in the city.  Riots broke numerous times in the Field of Mars.  Most were local battles between consulari and patrizi neighbors with stones and clubs, but one group acquired momentum and marched on Fortis Calafatus’ estate, where his guard had to awkwardly decline his “liberation” at the hands of the mob.  The violence culminated on September 9th, when a band of torch-bearing hoodlums attempted to burn down the estate of Senator DeRosa in the night.  The fire failed to spread to the main residence, but the Senator was sufficiently frightened to flee to the Lateran Palace.  He eventually returned to his estates with the help of Pietro Colonna, who had recently returned to the city and dispatched three dozen of his own men to help guard DeRosa’s estate.

Both Patrician Pierleone and Consul Calafatus were remarkably restrained in their actions.  The Consul complied with the house arrest even though his estate was unguarded, and his representatives openly called for peace in the streets.  Patrician Pierleone announced that he accepted the judgment of the court no matter what its outcome, and the magistrate cracked down on mobs in his “territory” west of the Tiber.  No calls were made by the Patrician for the execution of the verdict, but the continuing legal limbo of the Consul caused considerable unease throughout the season, a constant thorn in the side of a Senate struggling to maintain order and respectability.

The troubled waters were calmed, at least for a time, by the burial of Eugenius III on the 14th of September.  The arrival of the Papal legation marked the first time in which high officials of the Church had entered the city since the expulsion of Papal forces from the Lateran.  Though Pope Anastasius did not attend, the ecclesiastical dignitaries included Cardinal-Priest Rolando Bandinelli di Siena, Chancellor of the Holy Roman Church; Cardinal-Deacon Odone Bonecase, the Papal Protodeacon; Cardinal-Bishop Hugo de Beauvais; and Cardinal-Priest Ottaviano Crescenzi di Monticelli.  They were joined by fifty brilliantly attired Papal knights on white horses, led by Comes Tusculanensis Gionata Tusculani, the eldest son and heir of Tolomeo II, and followed by a lengthy train of monks and servants.  They were met by Consul Basile many other Senators beside, as well as Signore Pietro Colonna and Patrizio Giordano Pierleone, and the resident deacons of Rome’s great basilicas.

The Senate had been expecting great discord from the arrival of the Papal legation and the burial procession, but their fears proved unfounded.  Perhaps the Romans were eager for a break from their divisions and strife, or perhaps they truly admired the deceased Pope in death even if they had done him little courtesy in life.  The funeral procession in the city was assaulted by a mob, much to the horror of the Consul, but the mob’s outrage was that the procession had circumvented their neighborhood.  An impromptu negotiation – and a significant detour – placated them completely.  Not even Arnold of Brescia stirred up trouble, instead calling for Romans to humble themselves and pray for Eugene’s soul.  Throngs of Romans gathered to watch the blessed corpse pass along their street, preceded by monks bearing the crucifix and swinging thuribles, and followed by the Senatorial and Curial dignitaries, Roman equites and Papal knights, Cistercian monks, Roman priests, and house armsmen.  Trailing at their heels was a throng of Roman women in mourning, maids and widows alike, weeping and wailing dramatically.  Romans pressed close to the funeral carriage, trying to touch the Pope’s shroud.  Cardinal Hugo was said to have remarked to Consul Basile, “who could doubt that a man so honored on Earth already reigns in Heaven?”  The procession ended in the Leonine City, where the body was interred within a granite tomb of ancient craftsmanship beneath the Basilica of Saint Peter.

For a while, at least, there was harmony between the Romans and the Church, and Cardinals dined with Senators.  The Papal Chancellor made it clear that he was not at this time empowered to negotiate anything, but commended the Senate on their show of respect and asked that the Romans cease their aggression against church lands.  The legation did not stay long after the funeral, perhaps wary of wearing out their welcome among the Romans, and departed three days later with their knights and followers.  It did not take long for the tension of the first week of September to return to the streets of Rome, where it festers still.

In other news, the Senate has decided to adopt the legal theories of Martinus Gosia over his rival Bulgarus, recognizing the importance of the principle of equity in the application of Roman law.  Many believe this to be reflected in the recent verdict against Consul Calafatus, in which it is rumored the Bolognese Gosiani were more in favor of the Consul’s conviction than the Bulgari.

Expeditions

No expeditions occurred this year.  The small volunteer garrison of Castrum Nerulae remains, but is likely to retire to the city in winter, eager as the militiamen are to return to their trades.

Finances

Our system of wealth is being revamped this turn, and an updated list of personal and state finances will be posted separately as soon as it is completed.

Senatorial Inquests

Senators that requested information or launched endeavors have the results of their efforts listed here.  This information is private, but you may certainly choose to share it with the Senate.







Event: No Confidence

A group of senators have put forward a proposal to take the first step in the execution of Signore Calafatus’ sentence.  They propose that the Consul be immediately be stripped of his Consulship and membership within the equites – though they have stopped short of demanding his citizenship – and that the third-place winner of the Consular vote, Senator Vittorio Manzinni, be installed as his replacement for the remainder of the term.

So far, the motion does not have the votes to succeed, but many senators have reserved judgment until the Lesser Council weighs in on the issue.  The supporters of the proposal are a mix between the Consul's political opponents and those who have no particular issue with Signore Calafatus but believe that the Commune would be ill-served by relying on the Consulship of a man convicted of sedition and confined to his estates.  The strongest support for the motion comes from the non-noble equites, while it is generally opposed by the noble and Arnoldist factions, two groups that are otherwise almost never on the same side of an issue.  Players will not take a formal vote on this, but speeches to the Senate for and against the proposal by the end of the update will determine whether it passes.

Report to the Senate

Senators, we have returned as quickly as possible from Konstanz by the will of the Consuls, but have no happy news to report.  We, the Senate’s delegates to the King of Germany, were received without insult but were not heeded by the king or his ministers.  The representatives of the King and the Pope signed a treaty there in March, the relevant text of which we have copied and reproduce for the education of the Senate.

Treaty of Konstanz

The king will have one of his ministers to swear for him that he will not make a peace or a truce either with the Romans or with Roger of Sicily without the consent of the pope. The king will use all the power of his realm to reduce the Romans to subjection to the pope and the Roman church. He will protect the honor of the papacy and the regalia of St. Peter against all men to the best of his ability, and he will aid the church in recovering what she has lost. He will never grant any land in Italy to the king of the Greeks, and will use all his power in keeping him out. All these things the king promises to observe and to do in good faith.

The pope, on his part, promises on his apostolic faith, with the consent of the cardinals, that he will ever honor the king as the most dearly beloved son of St. Peter, and that he will give him the imperial crown whenever he shall come to Italy for it. He will aid the king in maintaining and increasing the honor of his realm, as his office demands. If anyone attacks the honor or the authority of the king, the pope at the request of the king will warn him to make satisfaction, and will excommunicate him if he refuses to heed the warning. The pope will not grant any land in Italy to the king of the Greeks, and will use all the resources of St. Peter to drive him out if he invades that land. All these things shall be observed in good faith by both parties, unless they are changed by mutual consent.

The Official Verdict

The following is the text of the verdict handed down by Senator DeRosa, recorded by notaries present at the proceedings.

Quote

First and foremost, I must thank the Senate and the good people of Rome for their patience during these trying times.

I wish to begin by looking at the facts of the case. Consul Calafatus and Patrician Pierleone agreed to meet in Rome to discuss a resolution to their dispute. The Consul’s home was designated the meeting site. Pierleone and his small retinue met the Consul’s larger force in the territory between Rome and the Patrician’s residence. The two forces traveled together to Rome, through the city gates and walked the hallowed streets of Rome and arrived at Consul Calafatus’ house. The Consul and the Patrician disagreed as to who should and should not be allowed entry into the Consul’s house and, from there, events spiraled out of control, eventually leading to Consul declaring that Patrician Pierleone attempted to assassinate Calafatus.

Now I shall render my opinion on the evidence and testimony brought to light by the two sides. I, personally, find it extremely unlikely that Patrician Pierleone would be coaxed out of his domain, ushered into the city of Rome by a veritable horde of soldiers loyal to Consul Calafatus AND have the unmitigated gall to attempt to assassinate the dear Consul in his own home, which was surrounded by the same horde of soldiers. No, that defies reason and sanity itself. The Patrician would have had a much easier time assassinating the Consul once he was within the bowels of the Consul’s home - be it through poison or a quick dagger to the throat.
 However, was Consul Calafatus’ aim to assassinate Patrician Pierleone? The Consul possessed a motive and a means to do so, but would not a better location to launch such an assault have been on the road to the Eternal City? Eliminate Patrician Pierleone and his men where there are none to bear witness to the event? To attempt an assassination of a well known figure within your own home seems dubious and fool hardy at best, scandalous at worst.

I personally believe a tense situation was escalated to violence by both parties. We will never know what truly occurred in the Consul’s home but, as I am sure everyone is well aware, the case is not solely dependent upon proving an assassination attempt or plot. Rather this case deals with famosis libellis.
 I have debated this issue fully with my legal advisors and my own conscious. I must say that this case was difficult to resolve because it deals with so much ambiguity within the law as to what does and does not constitute famosis libellis, or seditious libel. The legal scholars of Rome spent much time debating the meaning and intent of the law. I also weighed both its objective and denotation against the will of our own legal traditions, which are derived from both ancient Roman and Lombard law. Famosis libellis exists as a law because it seeks to protect the state from injury by the defamation of its officials, regardless of the medium of the false accusation.  Both Consul Calafatus and Patrician Pierleone are members of this great city’s government. For one official to commit the crime of libel against another official IS to commit the crime of libel against the state!

I find that Consul Calafatus did knowingly and purposefully commit famosis libellis – seditious libel. He committed the act with the hope to turn an unfavorable situation into a favorable one, following the terrible and tragic events that occurred that day. Strictly by the laws of our city, the punishment for famosis libellis is death. HOWEVER, it is, and always shall be, the prerogative judge to mitigate the punishment in light of services rendered to the state. The Consul has lead the city through difficult times as well as nobly sought and achieved victory in battle with the hopes of securing a brighter future, not only for ourselves but our children. However, he has defamed the state with his words and brought shame upon our city. I thus order Consul Calafatus to be stripped of his rank and his wealth. I further order that he be cast out of the Eternal City and exiled for a period of no less than ten years. No Roman is to aid him or have contact with him for the duration of his exile. Following his sentence, he will be allowed to enter the city and ask forgiveness from both God and the Senate. It will be up to the divine and the will of the Senate to decide whether they wish to grant all that Calafatus has lost back to him.

That Which Is To Come

Hello friends!  Sorry about all the delays, but this update needed a lot of PM discussions that took time to work out.  Reforming the wealth system is taking more time than I anticipated, so I will try to get that done tomorrow.  There are no updates to the maps this season, but I do have a few letters I still need to write.  As always, please notify me if I've missed or misunderstood anything.  Thanks!
« Last Edit: April 06, 2012, 09:33:30 PM by Polycarp » Logged

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« Reply #363 on: April 04, 2012, 12:43:59 AM »

Letter to Senator Sismondii

Senator,

I thank you for your condolences, and those expressed so powerfully by the Roman people.  I pray for peace between the Church and its flock, and hope to see our holy father once again enthroned in the Eternal City before I die.  You efforts are not forgotten, and I sincerely hope that they may be continued towards a resolution of this unfortunate schism.

His Eminence Odone Bonecase
Cardinal-Deacon of the Basilica of Saint Giorgio in Velabro
Protodeacon of the College of Cardinals
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« Reply #364 on: April 04, 2012, 01:05:05 AM »

Scores

Whoops, forgot to do the score changes I'd laid out.

Calafatus: -1 Influence
Sismondii: +1 Orthodoxy
Basile: +1 Orthodoxy
DeRosa: -1 Popularity
Manzinni: +1 Orthodoxy
De Vinti: No changes

Update: The rules for the new Wealth system are done but I'm still working on converting everyone's stats.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2012, 07:58:19 PM by Polycarp » Logged

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« Reply #365 on: April 04, 2012, 08:24:28 PM »

To the Senate

Dear Senators,
This autumn was as moving as it was busy, what with the dire news from abroad, the Pope Eugene III’s burial, and more importantly, the judgment brought upon Fortis Calafatus by Senator Domenico DeRosa. My hope is that the overall situation of the Great Republic of Rome will cool with the coming winter chill, but that might just be asking too much. Truly, there is much to be done to right the wrongs and continue on the rocky road to prosperity.

This vote of no confidence has me itching all over for a solution to the Via Salaria. I have no doubt that justice has spoken, but to be truly honest, Signore Calafatus strategic thinking and military knowledge brought us but only success. I wonder, is there a man capable of military feats equal to those of Fortis Calafatus? I, myself, would rather wait for one to rise or for my esteemed colleagues from the consiliarii to shed some wisdom on my blurred thoughts.

*pauses for a brief moment, before continuing on another subject*

And I take it all Senators have taken the time to read this Treaty of Konstanz? I hope all see the gravity of this accord, and the very clear threat made to the Romans and their friends. It sounds to me like King Frederick is making the Pope kneel down before him, a ludicrous thought on my part perhaps, but true nonetheless.

I have said this many times before, and will say this again. King Frederick must not march upon the lands of Italy.

*lets out a sigh*

Honestly, I tire of only speaking about it. Something has to be done, something concrete. So, I ask of those of you who are like-minded; will you join me in the protection of Rome?

*pauses for a brief moment, before continuing*

I would like to slip in a few words before sitting down. This treaty does, in fact, threaten us as much as it does Sicilians and Greeks. In times like this, Rome should double its efforts to befriend these neighbors. Together with our eastern friends, we can be a dissuasive force, and the many advantages that it would give our trading relationships would bolster our economy. I beg all Senators to pay attention when addressing Sicilians and Greeks, and to keep their eyes open for opportunities that would benefit Rome.

May God bless us all

*Bows politely and sits down*
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« Reply #366 on: April 04, 2012, 09:00:32 PM »

Private Letter to Vittorio Manzinni


My friend Manzinni,
I have been incredibly busy during the past season, and could not make time to converse with you, friend to friend. Alas, this season, I fear, will be just as busy, if not more, but current happenings require me to reach out to you. Thank the God it is you that has been made the centerpiece of the unfolding events, for my relationship with other parties sometimes border on hostilities, and my efforts to build a prosperous Rome would surely have been in vain.
   
I have heard the dire news about King Roger II’s health. These times must be stressful for you, but Romans have a strong heart and surpass such times only to become stronger. Though, would you need help, in any way, feel free to express your needs to me. I shall help as best a friend can.

The recent No Confidence motion pushed by some Senators have me worried, though they propose an excellent replacement for Calafatus, one that is less violent and more joyous. You. Needless to say, with you as Consul of the Exterior, the efforts required to befriend Sicilians would be eased, and pushing Rome to a much greater economic prosperity wouldn’t be a dream anymore, but a reality.

I would very much love it if this season, me and you could work together to move closer to an alliance with Sicily. There is probably something we can do to ease the pains of the ailing King Roger?

Senator Hugo De Vinti
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« Reply #367 on: April 04, 2012, 10:33:53 PM »

Notes for self

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« Reply #368 on: April 06, 2012, 02:07:57 AM »

New Wealth System


So, here it is, our new wealth system, as well as everyone's new stats.  Please feel free to comment; this is not immutable, and I am definitely willing to make changes if you, the players, feel it's for the best.  Please review your personal stat block and let me know if you visualized your IP as being different than I wrote, or if I missed any particular assets you'd like to see noted on your stat block.


Character Statistics
“Projects” indicates ongoing enterprises that require WP, or have been paid for but not yet completed.
“Assets” includes estates, possessions, items, completed projects, and other miscellaneous things you have that I am keeping track of.  Not all of these are wealth-related.

Arrigus Sismondii
Wealth Level 4 [4/16]
Savings: 6 WP
IP: 22 Wine, 2 Olives, 4 Wool
Projects: None
Assets: Estate

Fortis Calafatus
Wealth Level 4 [0/16]
Savings: 16 WP
IP: 24 Farmland
Projects: None
Assets: Estate, De Re Militari, 100 Heavy Infantry (2WP)

Vittorio Manzinni
Wealth Level 4 [4/16]
Savings: 8 WP
IP: 24 Egyptian Trade (Glassware, Linens), 4 Hospitality
Projects: None
Assets: Estate, Spears, Crossbows, Grain, Land in Ripe et Marmorate

Roberto Basile
Wealth Level 4 [0/16]
Savings: 8 WP
IP: 14 Sicilian Privateers, 10 Oranges
Projects: None
Assets: Estate

Domenico DeRosa

Wealth Level 4 [8/16]
Savings: 4 WP
IP: 24 Farmland, 8 Hospitality
Projects: Chapel [15/15]
Assets: Estate, Hostels, Land in Ripe et Marmorate

Hugo de Vinti
Wealth Level 4 [8/16]
Savings: 8 WP
IP: 14 Marble Trade, 10 Sculpture, 8 Flax Production
Projects: Palazzo [8/10]
Assets: Estate

Edit: I should add to this that the public treasury will be handled in much the same way as a player's wealth, except that the treasury derives its money from specific sources (tributes, taxes, etc.) rather than investments.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2012, 03:09:32 AM by Polycarp » Logged

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« Reply #369 on: April 06, 2012, 03:32:21 AM »

Meeting with Consul Calafatus

Out of Character

- Senator Sismondii will privately meet with Calafatus at his estate to see to his friend's condition

My countryman it worries me to see you in such a situation. I cannot speak for the situation with Pierleoni as I was not there. Yet I feel that the damage to Rome will be worse without you than if we had overturned his claims. Nevertheless what's done is done. I assure you that I shall voice my support of you and your character before the senate. If nothing else we shall work to overturn this talk of exile and confiscation of your rightful estate. You have done much for the city. Perhaps your unrelenting anger towards this Pierleoni has caused you more harm than necessary. Nevertheless, your efforts have brought prosperity and peace to Rome and we should not be so fast to forget. I will do what I can to remind the senate, and while the judgement continues to be debated I will do what I can to apprise you of the situation within the senate.

Out of Character

Senator Sismondii will bring Consul Calafatus news of the situation within the senate and discuss with him what is going on. He shall do so with the utmost privacy under the guise of regular visits to check up on his friend and fellow senator while the ban on meeting with him hasn't yet taken effect.

Speech before the Lesser Council

My fellow senators, this talk of exile and seizure of property concerns me I cannot speak to the acts of the Consul as I was not here to observe. I must then reserve myself to speaking to his noble character. I must say that it troubles me that the hero of Rome who has done so much for her is to be turned to the wolves on the very eve of his victory. To be victorious in the name of Rome and to be treated with exile and poverty as reward seems to speak ill to the character of Rome and its claim as a city of holiness. I have seen nothing but a constant effort from Senator Calafatus to improve the city and the life of its inhabitants. I ask then, which will be worse for the image of Rome? To be slandered? Or to be denied one of its fighting champions even as conflict and turmoil approach our very gates? I ask the senate to reconsider the complete exile of a brother Christian who has so fervently aided us.

Further Orders

- Sismondii will send letters to as many of the papal landowners who hold lands outside rome that have fled Rome as he possibly can offering something to the effect of:
"Rome has been in much turmoil recently and it is this turmoil that has forced you from the lands you once tended. While the turmoil lasts I understand why you cannot return, safety is a rare commodity in these troublesome times and so your fields lay useless and unused like the single talent of gold buried in the ground. I seek to mend the differences between Rome and the Church and as proof of my desire for peace and in turn hopefulness that the Church in turn wishes to see the City of St Peter returned to honor I would offer you the following. If you will grant Rome the right to oversee, through myself, your property until such time as you can safely return to your own, I will see to it that half of the proceeds gained from your land are paid to you (the remainder shall go to Rome to fund the improvement of the holy city). Once you can safely return, Rome will of course turn the lands back over to your jurisdiction. In this way land that has laid useless all this time shall once again bear fruit to the glory of god and his one true church."

- Sismondii will also send a letter to the owner of the land he seized with the same offer but with further explanation that he seized it out of haste due to Rome's dire need. He will sue for forgiveness... if the owner proves to be difficult he will offer up to 1 wp and some of the fine wool that his land has already produced as recompense. He will be clear to point out to the owner that if he denies Rome the chance to work his land he will gain nothing for himself and his charge and nothing for Rome and everyone will be worse off as a result.

- If Sismondii gets enough agreement from land owners to merit it he will invest 2 wp into purchasing more sheep and hiring more hands from the peasants on the land. He will try to do as little harm to the peasantry as possible but if it proves necessary to drive people off to make the land productive he won't hesitate.

- Seeing the troubling times approaching he will allocate the remaining 2 wp to starting construction on a Rocca on his estate. He will initially instruct that the estate be enclosed in a curtain wall large enough to surround it and include a small courtyard. Once the curtain wall is complete and his estate is fenced in he will begin converting the villa into a full Rocca.

- Finally he will donate 1 wp to the Roman treasury.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2012, 11:26:43 PM by Nomadic » Logged

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« Reply #370 on: April 06, 2012, 09:20:20 AM »

Letter to Giovani de Vinti


Gio-gio!
It is good to have news from the family in Sienna. Things are hectic around here, so I fear I won’t be able to come all the way there anytime soon.

I have a great favor to ask of you. See, I have this friend who has been threatened by a powerful gang in Rome. The reason I know not, but I know the man. He has a good heart, is brilliant and educated. It’s highly possible that he will seek shelter outside of Rome, for he fears for his life. If you would shelter him, I would be eternally grateful, and vow to repay this in some way, at some time.

His name is Signore Jiorge. I will have him speak only to you, uncle, so you know it is him. If he presents himself on your doorstep, please ask him to hand you the letter of instructions. It will be signed with a cross on which I will place a "V".

Again, thank you very much, and please do send me any requests that you may have.

My sincere thanks,
Hugo de Vinti

Private Meeting with Fortis Calafatus

*Execute formalities as if he was still Consul of the Exterior in its full right, but in a friendlier way*

Friend, I fear this judgment that has been brought upon you was inevitable, for the immediate security of Rome and, more so, the Senate. Though let me say that, in my heart, I don’t think it was the right thing to do. You are a hero of Rome, and just as you returned from yet another successful venture, this Pierleoni dog used his deceitful charms to turn the city and its laws against you.

I have already voiced my opinion of you in the Senate, and have done so in the past anyways. I will be working with whoever I must to keep you at our side, though success in this endeavor cannot be guaranteed.

Because of this, I have made arrangements for your safety, should you need to leave the Eternal City. Take this *hands him a letter*. They are instructions, whether you follow them or not is your choice, but you would have access to a link to the Senate and Rome.

I have to leave now, friend. I hope next time we meet it will be under more… joyous conditions.

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« Reply #371 on: April 06, 2012, 09:59:33 AM »

To the Lesser Council

I fully agree with Senator Sismondii. Consul Calafatus is a man of great achievements.

Though, reversing, or outright ignoring the decision of Senator DeRosa is a political hot potato. No doubt a civil war would emerge from this. The outcome is clear, of course, but the question is can we afford such a mess at such a time? Besides, what would be thought of the Senate? Although the outcome against the dissidents would be clear, would the Senate then fall right after its victory, just like it happened to Consul Calafatus?

The unity of Rome is at stake here. It’s either we respect the justice system we all worked to establish, or we do not respect it and suffer the consequences.
   

Letter to Sismondii

Senator Sismondii,
We are on the same page when it comes to the matter of Consul Fortis Calafatus. I find it most saddening that Rome decided to punish him after his many successes rather than thank him, and pay him due respects.

As I stated at the consiliarii, reversing the judgment will not be an easy task, but one I wish to accomplish nonetheless. Though, I’m not sure how we can do this on our own. We need support.

I have something to, let know. We ousted the Papacy by bloodshed, could the same not be achieved in regards to the Pierleonists and his stubborn allies? We have been to great lengths, especially our humble Consul Roberto Basile, to reunite them, but look at what they’ve done. They wasted no time to use their renewed powers to bring down those who gave it back to them. No doubt an attempt to attain the summit of power within the Great Republic of Rome.

The truth is that they cannot be allowed to do this. The Senate must remain the Senate, and its prominent figures must remain the Consuls and the senatores consiliarii.

I will wait for an answer before I go deeper into details, but let it be known that I have a few ideas brewing in my mind.

Sincerely,
Senator Hugo de Vinti
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« Reply #372 on: April 06, 2012, 12:13:55 PM »

Speech before the Lesser Council

We are a city of laws and a city of tradition. We do not have monarchs or Popes who put them selves above the law. In fact no man in Rome is above the law. Period. Signore Calafactus slandered the STATE. This is a most heinous crime and, if we were to enact the full weight of the law, he would be executed. I, being fair minded and taking into consideration his service to the city, commuted the sentence to that of mere exile for a short ten years. To refuse to carry out the court's decision amounts to sanctioning civil unrest! If one man is above the law, then why not more? Why not everyone?

 Signore Calafactus has been found guilty. To delay any longer in carrying out his sentence is to SHAME our city, our traditions and our laws.
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« Reply #373 on: April 06, 2012, 05:17:15 PM »

Speech Before the Senate

Senators! Still yourselves!

This past season has brought events of great import to our doorstep. The burial of His Holiness proceeded most smoothly, and brought some welcomed stillness to the fiery hearts of our brother Romans. I must thank you all for your part in this matter! It could not have been done without your support.

But all in Rome has not been so tranquil, nor so stately. The conviction of my fellow Consul, Fortis Calafatus, of the grave crime of Seditious Libel has consumed my thoughts these past weeks. I am grateful for the efforts of Senator DeRosa in his role as magistrate, and he applied himself to the task set before him as best as any Roman would be able, given the circumstances. And I find myself in agreement with his sentiment: no man is above the law. But nevertheless, the verdict has not sat well with me. Consul Calafatus submitted to the will of the Senate, and assented to confinement to his estate. Is this the action of a guilty man? Fortis is widely praised as hero of our Republic, and the popolo clamour for his release. As I am sure you are aware, Senators, there is more that must be considered here than the guilt and innocence of a single man, but the implications of such a verdict for our city.

In my role as High Magistrate - afforded to me by my Consular Office - I have pored over the facts of the case in effort to ascertain the veracity of the verdict, as requested in appeal by Consul Calafatus. A right afforded any citizen. In consultation with legal experts, and in my attempt to unravel the course of events, I have come to a final conclusion. The simple truth is that Consul Calafatus could not be guilty of such a crime. Giordanno Pierleone had been expelled from Communal Office, and no clarification to his status had at that point been made by our own Senate. Senators, responsibility for this situation lies entirely on our shoulders. It is the fault solely of our own lassitude. As such, I find it my responsibility to reduce the sentence passed down by Senator DeRosa. I hereby inform the Senate of the indictment of Fortis Calafatus of the crime of actio injurarum, for making defamatory statements against a fellow citizen of the Commune of Rome - one Giordano Pierleone. Consul Calafatus is to be fined [4 wp], he is to be confined to his estate for the remainder of this season, and his Communal Offices are to be prorogued until the coming of the Spring. I have dispatched a letter informing the Consul of his situation.

That is all, Senators.

Privately to Senator Manzinni

Senator Manzinni!

It is good that I should find you here... as there is a small matter of business that I would like to discuss with you. I recall our discussion on the matter of the crossbows that you had acquired. At the time, I stated unequivocally that Rome could not afford to purchase them for the armament of her private citizens in their role of militia-men. Alas, this is still the case.

I am given to understand that they have languished on your estate, unused, and providing you with no income. However... given the recent events, and the ever-precarious atmosphere of Rome I myself have taken it into consideration to purchase some small number of them for my own personal guard. Would you be amenable to the sale of half of your supply for a sum of [1 wealth point]? Come, surely you could do such a favour for a friend?

Letter to John of Palermo


John,

Again it is long since I have written you, and again I am filled with regret at my lateness. Please excuse my silence, for I have been consumed by the business of Rome, of which I have found myself Consul. Perhaps some word of our city has reached your ear. It was good to hear of the wellness of your family. My wife, daughters, and son remain healthy. Ricardo has grown into a fine young man. His horsemanship surpasses mine in every way, and I am pleased to say he is developing a sharp and shrewd mind under my tutelage. My wife has slowly warmed to him, and the two are as natural mother and son. I have heard of the misfortune of Sicily, that of the health of His Majesty. Know that my prayers are with him and his family.  

But misfortune is cruel, and however awful its works, it is not wont to stay its hand regardless of the terrible suffering it has already caused. Frederick has signed treaty with the Papacy at Constance, and the terms do not favour either one of our realms. His mission is plain, that of the subjugation of all of Italy, and I fear his will is more real than ever, and he means to make good on his promises. We must work together if we are to persevere through the coming onslaught of the Germans. If there is anything you can do, please make plain the urgency of this matter at His Majesty's court, and make reminder of the waiting friendship of the Romans.

Your friend,

Roberto Basile, Consul of Rome

Letter to Niccolo Cappoci

Signore Cappoci,

I have heard that you call yourself a friend to the Romans. Know that Rome is ever grateful to her friends, and would see such budding relationships blossom into the fullness of their flower. The assistance granted so generously by yourself to the Army of Rome this year past is not forgotten, and Rome looks to return such favour as she can.

The might of Rome and her allies is ever growing, and we would not have your domain languish forgotten on the sidelines. I wonder, would you find yourself interested in a more permanent expression of friendship to Rome? Know that for our part, you would be offered the full protection that Roman arms can grant.

Consul Roberto Basile

Letter to Giordano Pierleone

Patrician Pierleone,

By now it is likely that you have heard of the motion of appeal and its result concerning your case against Fortis Calafatus. By the fact of your silence on the matter of his house arrest, I find it likely that you understand the gravity of the situation, and the potential for extraordinary bloodshed should a harsh verdict be passed down against Signore Calafatus. Rome must be united, our enemies outside our walls are many and ever conspire to pull us down. I would ask you, out of the spirit of Christian charity, that you let this matter lie, and accept the ultimate verdict of the Curia Senatus.

As ever, Giordano, I am grateful for the part you play in our government, and the part you play in upholding the unity of the Romans.

Consul Roberto Basile

Orders for Winter 1153

- Using my Consular and Magisterial authority, rescind Senator DeRosa's verdict. In appeal, Fortis Calafatus is found guilty of the lesser charge of actio injurarum and is to be punished as laid out in my speech to the Senate. Send a letter to Fortis Calafatus informing him of the result of the appeal of his sentence.

- Initiate construction of a fortified tower-house of [15 wp] on the grounds of my estate. Put [6 wp] towards construction this season. Hire known and trusted masons and builders previously employed by myself on the repair of the Aurelian walls if possible. Additionally scavenge suitable and sound building materials from the nearby Baths of Diocletian (or other ruins) if financially expedient. Occasionally offer tempting and delicious Basile oranges to the workers in attempt to improve morale.

- Establish a guard of 100 men, outfitting them as masnada. Preferential recruitment to veterans of Rome's recent battles.

- Having to this point neglected my fatherly duties in this regard, begin search for a suitable match in marriage for Ricardo, my 18 year old son born of my first marriage.

- Apply my political influence, power and personal effort to the purposes of persuading Senators to return to the Curia Julia, and to ensure they vote to strike down the proposed motions of no confidence.

  Note to PC: Remember court fines! Also, I will be owed a letter from John of Palermo.

Should be final now.
« Last Edit: April 13, 2012, 08:57:56 PM by TheMeanestGuest » Logged

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« Reply #374 on: April 06, 2012, 06:29:07 PM »

Letter to Villano Gaetani, Archbishop of Pisa

Your Excellency Villano Gaetani, Archbishop of Pisa,
Words echo as far as Rome that Pisa seeks to build one magnificent cathedral, the Baptistry of the Pisan Cathedral. I, Senator Hugo De Vinti of the Republic of Rome, have heard of this project’s grandeur, and wish to convey my interest in participating to its making.

Of course such a statement may appear as daring, perhaps even insulting, considering the treatment Romans gave the late Pope Eugene III; a proud and worthy Pisan. But it is here among Romans that His Holiness was interred. I have to admit; I have rarely seen the Romans as calm and united as I have during the funeral procession. I hope such news will comfort you, if even only a bit.

You might be asking yourself what good would come of Romans contributing to the construction of this edifice. You might know my family, perhaps even myself, for we are renowned marble workers, as well as traders. I have made many sculptures, some even for Eugene III himself, which he displayed in the Lateran Palace here in Rome. My work is spread throughout Italy, notably in Tuscany, Rome and Sicily.

I could offer you the best marble that I have at hand, and task my best workers with working it into the marvel that the cathedral is to become. I would even make myself available to work sculptures of moderate size. Anything bigger would be handled by my most capable men, as I stated earlier, for my duty here as a Senator keeps me from traveling too far abroad. But do not worry, my men are the most skilled in Italy, without a doubt.

Would you be interested in dealing with the best of Italy, I invite you to contact me, and provide me with your actual needs so as to I may propose the best of deals.

Sincerely,
Senator Hugo De Vinti of the Republic of Rome

-Next letter is a copy of the one I posted a few post above. Just wanted to have it here so you have all the letters you might want to send a response to at the same place.

Letter to Giovani de Vinti


Gio-gio!
It is good to have news from the family in Sienna. Things are hectic around here, so I fear I won’t be able to come all the way there anytime soon.

I have a great favor to ask of you. See, I have this friend who has been threatened by a powerful gang in Rome. The reason I know not, but I know the man. He has a good heart, is brilliant and educated. It’s highly possible that he will seek shelter outside of Rome, for he fears for his life. If you would shelter him, I would be eternally grateful, and vow to repay this in some way, at some time.

His name is Signore Jiorge. I will have him speak only to you, uncle, so you know it is him. If he presents himself on your doorstep, please ask him to hand you the letter of instructions. It will be signed with a cross on which I will place a "V".

Again, thank you very much, and please do send me any requests that you may have.

My sincere thanks,
Hugo de Vinti

Winter, 7th Turn

- Continue work on the expansion of my estate into a palazzo. This means start hiring skilled workers and gathering up the necessary materials for the construction, which I would like to start as soon as possible. [This means I’m spending the 2 WPs necessary to complete its funding.]

- Continue investing in the Flax industry. For the winter, this will mainly mean that I will pay the experts who have come from Naples to give introductory sessions and courses on how to work Flax. It seems as if many things have to be covered, from the seeding to the harvest to the working it into linen cloth. If each of the processes, that the experts know about, can be touched as to maximize preparation for the Spring, surely the waste on my first production, and thus the hit on its potential income,  will be less intense than if I’d just let things go without notifying anyone about anything. [I see this as investing in the Flax Production, and towards my new Wealth Level. I spend 2 WPs on that.]

- Send my agent for Naples over there again, in an attempt to recruit even more expert Flax workers, especially in the processes that are not already covered by the experts already recruited. There is no additional incentive than last time, and we are well aware that this might be a fruitless endeavor. He is also tasked with keeping an eye on the situation in Sicily, as to the happenings in the higher circles of politics, mainly Roger II’s health and the power struggle over the throne.

Actions regarding the current Senatorial mishaps

- Use 2 WP of my Savings to form a force of 25 men as best equipped as they can be. I would pick from veterans of Calafatus campaigns and only those that still show utmost loyalty even after the recent events, notably DeRosa's judgement. Of course I would seek Calafatus advice on who to pick to get the best of the best. The Savings, which are under the form of art, most probably, would be exchanged for foods and living necessities that the men and their family need, as well as the required equipement. Pick the most loyal, strategic and capable to act as officer. [If 25 men for 2 WP is ridiculously too much for too little gain, make it 50 men]

[Have them join Basile's men. The officer would state that they are to be used only if absolutely necessary, and that if Senator Hugo De Vinti so wishes, the Quorum is met or Consul Basile dismisses them, they would return under my command and to my estate]

- Station men at city exits to spy on dissidents leaving the city. They must report the direction in which they're heading, and if possible, their intentions. [Dissidents are pretty much anybody aligned with Senator DeRosa, be they Senators, Families, Messengers or Else]

Intelligence Operations

- Inquire as to the defenses of the cities (the -main- ones) of the Faliscan League. [Here, information about the probabilities of a successful assault on their most strategically significant points according to the geography, fortifications, number of men, equipement is what I seek. To make it, perhaps, easier and cut down on the workload you can give me the weak spots and the strong spots, always considering they are, in fact, strategically significant to them. This is not a pressing matter and can be done during the proceedings of next turn]

- Send an agent to gather information as to the supply routes of the cities of the Faliscan League. Mainly those that are relevant to said strategically significant spots that they will want to maintain should we launch an expedition in Faliscan territory. [This -could- just be considered as giving bonus points if we were to eventually make an assault, I don't think I actually -NEED- to have the written information]
« Last Edit: April 13, 2012, 07:06:57 PM by Pymtein Magnushake » Logged


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